crown-of-thorns


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crown-of-thorns

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Rising ocean temperatures as a result of climate change pose the greatest challenge to the survival of the Great Barrier Reef, compounded by poor water quality and outbreaks of the major predators of corals, the crown-of-thorns starfish.
The reef robot has so far managed to remove around 50,000 crown-of-thorns starfish, according to the Australian government.
Giant tritons only eat about one crown-of-thorns starfish per week, so breeding enough of them to control big populations is not really feasible," said Dr.
They have divers go down and one at a time, into the crown-of-thorns starfish, they inject a protein called sodium bisulphate and that then kills them," he said.
The team began its research when it heard that crown-of-thorns starfish would swim to the sea floor in shallow Okinawa Prefecture waters, where they rarely go, to feed on dead urchins.
Pattern of outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci L.
Spines and ossicles also abound in deeper, older sediments, revealing the crown-of-thorns as a longtime resident, the team reports in the Aug.
Crown-of-thorns starfish control will also be ramped up with more boats and trained culling teams.
Australia: An Australian research team said Monday they have found an effective way to kill the destructive crown-of-thorns starfish, which is devastating coral reefs across the Pacific and Indian oceans.
It's a thorny plant, and its name is crown-of-thorns (Euphorbia Milii).
Knowing and respecting the zoning rules is particularly important now with the Reefs health under pressure from consecutive years of mass coral bleaching, impacts from a severe cyclone, and an ongoing crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak.
Intense tropical cyclones -- 34 in total since 1985 -- were responsible for much of the damage, accounting for 48 percent, with outbreaks of the coral-feeding crown-of-thorns starfish linked to 42 percent.