Crossmatch

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crossmatch

Serologic crossmatch Transfusion medicine An agglutination test that determines donor-recipient blood compatibility. See Electronic crossmatch, Immediate spin crossmatch, Major crossmatch, Minor crossmatch.
Crossmatch
Major crossmatch Patient serum–which may contain antibodies is cross-reacted against the donor's red cells and
Minor crossmatch Patient RBCs are incubated with donor serum, this is of less clinical significance; it reveals donor antibodies against uncommon antigens–eg Cw, -Wra, -Lia 

Crossmatch

A laboratory test done to confirm that blood from a donor and blood from the recipient are compatible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results show that imlifidase treatment rapidly and prior to transplantation inactivated donor specific antibodies (DSAs) and converted positive crossmatches to negative.
Positive crossmatches indicate that the recipient possesses DSA that can potentially cause rejection, and therefore a more suitable donor must be found.
This was a retrospective study that collated data from all crossmatches performed in our laboratory in 2013, as part of pre-transplant screening for living donor renal transplants.
(6) They showed that, similar to the use of routine red blood cell (RBC) crossmatches to detect recipient antibodies that could cause posttransfusion hemolysis, a positive pretransplant crossmatch, using recipient serum and donor lymphocytes, frequently predicted hyperacute renal allograft rejection.
Anti-HLA DSA strength is commonly assessed by the MFI value provided by SAB tests or the mean channel shift provided by cell-based flow cytometry crossmatches [47].
Prior to transplantation, recipients are therefore routinely screened for preformed antiHLA antibodies and prospective crossmatches are performed by conventional complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM) techniques, but also by flow-cytometrybased methods [1, 2].
Crossmatches are performed with unseparated cells, T-cells, or B-cells.
However, both can be subject to interference, (8,11) and even if both crossmatches are negative, early graft rejections still occur.
Crossmatches are then performed using flow cytometry and complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays (Betkowski et al., 2002).
The transfusion services in the Corpus Christi routinely perform type and screen on patients for selected surgical procedures and only perform immediate spin crossmatches for antibody negative patients receiving transfusion.
For example, Surgeon E uses 1.5 tests per patient for crossmatching, and crossmatches 80% of his patients, while his/her colleagues use from 2.2 to 3.1 tests per patient for crossmatching, and crossmatch virtually 100% of their patients.