crossed syndrome

crossed syndrome

Neurology A cranial nerve lesion opposite the side of a hemiplegia, which may occur in transient occlusion of the basilar artery
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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This larger pattern is often described as upper crossed syndrome (UCS) and is so named because a cross (X) can be placed across the upper body.
Lumbar hyperlordosis is a prominent feature of the postural distortional pattern that is known as lower crossed syndrome (ICS - see Figure 3).
Pain was idiopathic and experienced as radiculopathy (48%), localized (46%), or lower crossed syndrome (6%).
"When the bottom and stomach muscles become weak and the hip flexor muscles become tight, Lower Crossed Syndrome can develop," Anne Elliott, lecturer at the London Sport Institute, Middlesex University, said.
(9,10) Based on his clinical observations, Janda suggested that this particular test could be used as a means of assessing for a particular functional muscle imbalance (variously referred to as "lower crossed syndrome," "distal crossed syndrome," or "pelvic crossed syndrome") that he deemed to be important in the development and/or perpetuation of low back pain (LBP).
Upper crossed syndrome is a common postural dysfunctional pattern that describes the dysfunctional tone of the musculature of the shoulder girdle/cervicothoracic region of the body.
This condition is designated as the upper crossed syndrome because a similar postural dysfunctional pattern called the lower crossed syndrome is found across the pelvic girdle/lumbosacral region.
The primary cause of upper crossed syndrome is chronic postural stress to the upper body.
For this reason, upper crossed syndrome often results in opposing muscle groups that are described as locked short and locked long, neither of which are strong and efficient in their contraction capability.
The first and most obvious sign of upper crossed syndrome is the characteristic postural dysfunction of protracted scapulae, medially rotated humeri, hyperkyphotic (overly flexed) upper thoracic spine, and a protracted/ anteriorly held head, which is created by hypolordosis or even kyphosis (excessive flexion) of the lower cervical spine, hyperlordosis (excessive extension) of the upper cervical spine and head, and anterior translation of the head upon the atlas (Table 2).
Assume the upper crossed syndrome posture and attempt to take in a deep breath.
Assessment of upper crossed syndrome follows from the signs and symptoms of this condition.