cross-tolerance


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cross-tolerance

 [kros´tol-er-ans]
extension of the tolerance for a substance to others of the same class, even those to which the body has not been exposed previously.

cross-tolerance

/cross-tol·er·ance/ (kros´tol-er-ans) extension of the tolerance for a substance to others of the same class, even those to which the body has not been exposed previously.

cross-tolerance

(krôs′tŏl′ər-əns, krŏs′-)
n.
Tolerance or resistance to an effect or effects of a compound as a result of tolerance previously developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tolerance

a tolerance to other drugs that develops after exposure to a different agent. An example is the cross-tolerance that develops between alcohol and barbiturates.

cross-tol·er·ance

(kraws tol'ĕr-ăns)
The resistance to one or more effects of a compound as a result of tolerance developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tol·er·ance

(kraws tol'ĕr-ăns)
Resistance to one or several effects of a compound as a result of tolerance developed to a pharmacologically similar compound.

cross-tolerance,

References in periodicals archive ?
The sedative-hypnotic drugs, including alcohol and benzodiazepines, have cross-tolerance and dependence to one another so that any may be substituted for the other.
Alternatively, cross-tolerance between the two drugs may reduce the drugs' aversive effects and motivate people to use more of the drugs in order to achieve the same rewarding effects.
The possibility that tolerance and cross-tolerance to the effects of alcohol and nicotine contribute to their co-use will be discussed, as will the evidence for a shared genetic predisposition to concurrently use or abuse alcohol and nicotine.
The development of tolerance resulting from chronic exposure to one drug also can confer cross-tolerance to one or more other drugs.
The development of cross-tolerance between alcohol and nicotine may contribute to the concurrent use of both drugs in humans.
Experimental evidence of cross-tolerance between alcohol and nicotine comes from several lines of research.
Extending these demonstrations of cross-tolerance from animal models to the phenomenon of concurrent alcohol and nicotine dependence in humans, one could hypothesize that people who regularly consume both alcohol and nicotine may develop dependence on both drugs more rapidly than if they consumed only one drug, because the rate of tolerance development would be increased.
Alcohol tolerance and nicotine cross-tolerance in adolescent mice.
Furthermore, cross-tolerance between the behavioral effects of alcohol and nicotine has been seen in experimental studies--that is, animals that develop tolerance to the effects of one drug may also become tolerant to the effect s of the other drug (e.
Conditioning factors that contribute to dependence on one drug may increase dependence on another drug, and it is possible that conditioning factors are involved in the cross-tolerance reported between some actions of alcohol and nicotine.
A comparison of the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on tolerance to nicotine and cross-tolerance to ethanol in long- and short-sleep mice.