cross-sectional


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cross-sec·tion·al

(kros'sek'shŭn-ăl),
1. In histology, a sectioning of a tissue or organ perpendicular to its longitudinal axis.
2. Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
See: synchronic.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cross-sec·tion·al

(kraws sekshŭn-ăl)
Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The cross-sectional area of the structures for such construction technology is selected according to expressions (1)-(4), though in this case coefficient k should be sufficiently high (>325).
SI values of lipid-related parameters affected AS progression more significantly than cross-sectional blood lipid levels did.
Also as mentioned earlier, cross-sectional research cannot fully demonstrate changes over time as can longitudinal research.
It is important to know the geometric characteristics of the graft including the length, cross-sectional area, and surface attachment of ACL in order to determine the optimal mechanical graft properties and obtain optimal ACL reconstruction results.
(If the traces were smaller, the via cross-sectional area would exceed that of the trace and should be okay from a heating standpoint "by definition.")
Conversely, during exhalation cross-sectional area decreases and the velocity of the flow increases.
[9], the cross-sectional area of the quadriceps was the average of three measurements within 10 percent of one other.
All else being the same and assuming identical and proper heart-lung shot placement, by gradually increasing the calibre (cross-sectional area) of the needle (bullet) one will at some stage reach the point where the permanent wound surface area (trauma) caused by the needle (bullet) will become large enough to cause a fast enough haemorrhaging tempo to interrupt blood flow and thus oxygen supply to the animal's brain to cause its eventual demise.
A number of recently developed panel unit root tests allow for the presence of structural breaks and cross-sectional dependence.
The cross-sectional geometry which is defined by the global conditions is characterized by slender plates which are susceptible from the aspect of local stress.
Of the 40 articles analyzed, 36 were cross-sectional studies (one multisite), three cohort studies (two historical cohorts) and a descriptive study.