cross-resistance


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resistance

 [re-zis´tans]
1. opposition, or counteracting force, as opposition of a conductor to passage of electricity or other energy or substance.
2. the natural ability of a normal organism to remain unaffected by noxious agents in its environment; see also immunity.
3. in psychology or psychiatry, conscious or unconscious defenses against change, preventing repressed material from coming into awareness; they can take such forms as forgetfulness, evasions, embarrassment, mental blocks, denial, anger, superficial talk, intellectualization, or intensification of symptoms. It occurs because the blocked association or understanding would be too threatening to face at this point in the therapy; identification of what point the resistance comes at can be an important indicator of the patient's unconscious patterns.
airway resistance the opposition of the tissues of the air passages to air flow: the mouth-to-alveoli pressure difference divided by the rate of air flow. Symbol RA or RAW.
androgen resistance resistance of target organs to the action of androgens, resulting in any of a spectrum of defects from a normal male phenotype in which men have normal genitalia but infertility to complete androgen resistance in which the individual has a female phenotype. Complete androgen resistance is an extreme form of male pseudohermaphroditism in which the individual is phenotypically female but is of XY chromosomal sex; there may be rudimentary uterus and tubes, but the gonads are typically testes, which may be abdominal or inguinal in position. Called also testicular feminization and testicular feminization syndrome. Incomplete androgen resistance is any of various forms less than the complete type, manifested by a male phenotype with various degrees of ambiguous genitalia such as hypospadias and a small vaginal pouch, a hooded phallus, or a bifid scrotum that may or may not contain gonads.
drug resistance the ability of a microorganism to withstand the effects of a drug that are lethal to most members of its species.
insulin resistance see insulin resistance.
multidrug resistance (multiple drug resistance) a phenomenon seen in some malignant cell lines: cells that have developed natural resistance to a single cytotoxic compound are also resistant to structurally unrelated chemotherapy agents. Called also cross-resistance.
peripheral resistance resistance to the passage of blood through the small blood vessels, especially the arterioles.
pulmonary vascular resistance the vascular resistance of the pulmonary circulation; the difference between the mean pulmonary arterial pressure and the left atrial filling pressure divided by the cardiac output. Called also total pulmonary vascular resistance.
total peripheral resistance the vascular resistance of the systemic circulation: the difference between the mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure divided by the cardiac output.
total pulmonary resistance (total pulmonary vascular resistance) pulmonary vascular resistance.
vascular resistance the opposition to blood flow in a vascular bed; the pressure drop across the bed divided by the blood flow, conventionally expressed in peripheral resistance units. Symbol R or R.

cross-resistance

(krôs′rĭ-zĭs′təns, krŏs′-)
n.
Tolerance to a usually toxic substance as a result of exposure to a similarly acting substance: Some insects develop cross-resistance to insecticides.

cross-re·sis·tance

(kraws rĕ-zistăns)
Resistance to one agent or drug that confers resistance to another, usually similar agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Park, "Cross-resistance between rifampicin and rifabutin and its relationship with rpoB gene mutations in clinically isolated MDR-TB strains," Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, vol.
In the present study, cross-resistance of strains with reduced FOM susceptibility to other antimicrobial drugs was not significantly higher than in other strains, and these strains were not concentrating on specific genotypes.
(15) The multidrug resistance of P aeruginosa may be caused in part by cross-resistance. (6)
This resistance may be partially attributed to cross-resistance among drugs (e.g., cross-resistance of ET with INH).
Results: P-glycoprotein- or BCRP overexpressing tumor cells did not reveal cross-resistance to reserpine.
Both health boards said the men " had previously taken another drug, abiraterone, and there were concerns about cross-resistance.
In contrast, owing to the structural and functional similarity between AMK and KAN, there is extensive cross-resistance between them.
Cross-resistance in sap-feeding insect strains--which are Isoclast's primary target--has been lacking because of metabolic differences between Isoclast and other insecticides.
Most of the mutations concerned the drugs used in first-line therapy, but a few patients developed cross-resistance to similar drugs.
frugiperda should provide great value for analyzing cross-resistance to other Bt corn technologies, especially to the recently commercialized pyramided Bt corn.
Solatenol is a new benz-pyrazole SDHI fungicide which brings a new mode of action with no cross-resistance to existing fungicides.
Data in Table 4 showed that there is no cross-resistance to other insecticides including those working at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (thiamethoxam).