cross-pollination

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cross-pollination

the transfer of pollen from the anthers of one flower to the stigma of another by the action of wind, insects, etc., with the subsequent formation of pollen tubes. Compare SELF-POLLINATION. see POLLINATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Co-working tenants will be members of a communal workplace where ideas can cross-pollinate and flourish in a variety of open work spaces, common lounge areas, meeting rooms, private offices, and the building's 4,000 s/f rooftop terrace.
Original content from all three brands will cross-pollinate to serve the audience of auto enthusiasts.
It's neat to cross-pollinate between the different disciplines."
Other plants, including squash and cucumbers, produce male and female flowers that cross-pollinate. To produce a crop, insect pollinators, wind or gardeners must transfer pollen from a male flower to the pistil of a female flower.
Combined, both companies will cross-pollinate emerging customer needs with software mash-ups.
The show will also offer regional attendees an exclusive opportunity to cross-pollinate ideas between industries.
'To bring those 20 round trips to link together New England's two largest cities -- both college towns, both biotech hubs, both innovation hubs -- allows people more options to cross-pollinate where they live and work.'
"IWS 2014 is a must attend event because it provides a forum for leaders and water professionals to cross-pollinate ideas and learn from each other.
The company says these products demonstrate its ability to cross-pollinate technology from other markets and to customize products to meet single user requirements.
I use SUCCESS to cultivate ideas from other industries and cross-pollinate effective concepts.
Can trees cross-pollinate to create blended offspring?
Justifying its decision, the Polish Agriculture Ministry cited concerns that GM crops may cross-pollinate with non-GM crops and MON810 maize pollen may find its way into honey.