cross-fertilize

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cross-fertilize

(krôs′fûr′tl-īz′, krŏs′-)
intr. & tr.v. cross-fertil·ized, cross-fertil·izing, cross-fertil·izes
To undergo or cause to undergo cross-fertilization.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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But cross-fertilisation should not be confined to talent exchange programmes and task-specific requirements.
His new work on "secret sharers" continues to look at the whole while at the same time focussing on a subgenre of Italian comedy that he finds throughout the peninsula and adduces as evidence of a far greater cross-fertilisation than is commonly acknowledged.
It does not make any direct demands on the Commission's Agenda 2000 reform package, but makes a general calls for transparency, and the promotion of cross-fertilisation between regions and Member States.
"There's a tremendous cross-fertilisation of styles and a support network between the bands.
'This is with a view to promoting cross-fertilisation of ideas and inclusive action plan aimed at addressing all forms of corruption, and to engender accountability, and transparency in the state institutions and governance processes,' he stated.
Some people call it 'cross-fertilisation of fan bases'.
They can have two different clientele but hopefully by having them in close juxtaposition to each other some cross-fertilisation will take place."
From distant memories of Super Mario Bros and Streetfighter to more recent aberrations ( Lara Croft: Tomb Raider and Resident Evil ( someone should call "game over" on this fruitless cross-fertilisation of the two entertainment forms.
There's not much cross-fertilisation here as music splits cleanly down the cultural divide.
The fish were then kept in massive tanks on land for a year to avoid any risk of cross-fertilisation with wild salmon.
This move outside the church precincts exposed the Sacre Rappresentazioni to cross-fertilisation from secular pageants and entertainments, which eventually led to the development of operatic form in the late sixteenth century.