cross-contamination

(redirected from cross-contaminate)

cross-con·tam·i·na·tion

(kraws kŏn-tami-nā­shŭn)
Transfer of infectious agent or matter from one person or site to another.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
MACHINEs used to slice breads containing nuts, seeds and other products could cross-contaminate safe baked goods.
* Don't cross-contaminate! You don't have to touch a reptile or amphibian to get sick from their germs.
Do not cross-contaminate your food by using the same utensils for raw meat or eggs, and fresh fruits and vegetables, until those utensils have been thoroughly washed.
From raw cookie dough to chicken wings, you want to be careful not to cross-contaminate surfaces, so disinfect and clean those food-prep areas often, including cutting boards.
Raw mince meat was found stored next to a container of ready-to-eat lettuce near the pot wash sink, meaning potentially harmful bacteria could cross-contaminate. Inspectors found an out-of-date carton of whole milk in the fridge, as well as cooked rice left out at room temperature.
You can cross-contaminate your textiles in the laundry, so I'm into anti-microbial--and one of the best is chlorine beach.
"If this is not done, antibiotic resistance from imprudent sectors will cross-contaminate the whole system and we will quickly find ourselves in a situation where our antibiotics are no longer effective."
But any plan to implement composting and recycling programs will hinge on proper trash sorting, so that the various materials do not cross-contaminate facilities.
She said: "I don't think I will ever cross-contaminate my private life and my family life with my public and professional worlds.
Storage-Tainted teas, where teas cross-contaminate at the manufacturer's facilities or during shipping, are a huge industry issue.
An animated "Germ-Vision" graphic then shows that washing chicken only risks splattering and spreading bacteria that then can cross-contaminate other foods and kitchen surfaces.
It can still cross-contaminate food even in boiling water." A succinct and practical "how-to" manual, The Art of Planning Allergen-Free Events is worthy of the highest recommendation for amateur and professional event planners alike!