contingency table

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Related to cross-classification: categorizations, assortments

con·tin·gen·cy ta·ble

a tabular cross-classification of data such that subcategories of one characteristic are indicated in rows (horizontally) and subcategories of another are indicated in columns (vertically).
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Contingency tableclick for a larger image
Fig. 119 Contingency table . A contingency table for eye and hair colours in a sample population.

contingency table

a method of presenting results so as to show relationships between two characters which can then be tested statistically by a modified CHI-SQUARED TEST (the heterogeneity chi-square test). For example, eye colour and hair colour might be measured in a sample population and the results presented in a contingency table.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When theory is available, complete cross-classification could be combined with alternative weighting schemes that incorporate clinically meaningful relationships among conditions.
The effects of age and sex could be modeled almost equally well using either dummy cross-classification variables or linear piecewise and interaction effects.
The management of the data required its processing for purification and for software compatibility as well as homogeneous groupings for cross-classification analysis.
The analyses of the data included those of the means and distributions, cross-classification, correlations, the test of chi-square and the test of significant difference between group means.
A cross-classification analysis was performed on the data to gain further insight in students' performance in high school as well as in aptitude tests upon their graduation from the two high school programs.
Table 4 is the cross-classification of severity and the outcome.
Table 5 is the cross-classification of treatment and severity.
Table 5 reports the cross-classification of these variables for the item describing online learning as not being and easy out.
The cross-classification analysis (Table 3) revealed no major misclassification for any of the nutrients studied.
More importantly, a cross-classification analysis showed that the FFQ placed 96% of participants into the same or adjacent quartile of intake for protein and calcium, and 98% of participants into the same or adjacent quartile of intake for vitamin D and vitamin K.
Cross-classifications show that appreciable numbers of Nones are found in all the logically possible combinations of these indicators, even such a priori "impossible" combinations as respondents wile do not believe in a personal God but do think the Bible is divinely inspired.
(Note to any methodologist who may be eavesdropping: Yes, I did look at age cross-classifications. No, they do not matter much for the present discussion.