crop

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crop

(krŏp)
n.
Zoology
a. A pouchlike enlargement of a bird's gullet in which food is partially digested or stored for regurgitation to nestlings.
b. A similar enlargement in the digestive tract of annelids and insects.

crop

  1. in vertebrates, particularly some birds, an expanded part of the oesophagus where food is stored.
  2. in invertebrates, an expansion of the anterior part of the gut system where food is either digested or stored.
  3. the agricultural or commercial fishery yield.
  4. in ecological terms, the difference between gross annual production and the net production - i.e. the material eaten by predators (or herbivores where the food is a vegetable), including that taken by man, and that consumed by organisms responsible for decay. See STANDING CROP.
References in classic literature ?
Ancient poetry and mythology suggest, at least, that husbandry was once a sacred art; but it is pursued with irreverent haste and heedlessness by us, our object being to have large farms and large crops merely.
The Sheikh of the village spoke of the crops from which the rulers of all lands draw revenue; but the Governor's eyes were fixed, between his horse's ears, on the nearest water-channel.
And if there's a good crop you shall have half a rouble for every acre."
Just the same they got bumper crops, an' father's house-patch of tomatoes was eaten by the black beetles.
The crop was, however, enormous and brought high prices.
"It always makes me think of a ship sailing into port, Nellie," Rose had once exclaimed, "the crop coming in.
Three minutes later he was telling me that the condition of the maize crop was something disgraceful, and that the railway companies would not pay him enough for his timber.
Uncle Henry grew poorer every year, and the crops raised on the farm only bought food for the family.
However, as my arable land was but small, suited to my crop, I got it totally well fenced in about three weeks' time; and shooting some of the creatures in the daytime, I set my dog to guard it in the night, tying him up to a stake at the gate, where he would stand and bark all night long; so in a little time the enemies forsook the place, and the corn grew very strong and well, and began to ripen apace.
Think how this left us; a man, a woman and two children, to gather a crop that was planted by so much greater force, yes, and pro- tect it night and day from pigeons and prowling animals that be sacred and must not be hurt by any of our sort.
The brood had almost grown to their full strength and attained the use of their wings and the full plumage of their feathers, when the owner of the field, looking over his ripe crop, said, "The time has come when I must ask all my neighbors to help me with my harvest." One of the young Larks heard his speech and related it to his mother, inquiring of her to what place they should move for safety.
My head feels deliciously light and cool, and the barber said I could soon have a curly crop, which will be boyish, becoming, and easy to keep in order.