crop

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crop

(krŏp)
n.
Zoology
a. A pouchlike enlargement of a bird's gullet in which food is partially digested or stored for regurgitation to nestlings.
b. A similar enlargement in the digestive tract of annelids and insects.

crop

  1. in vertebrates, particularly some birds, an expanded part of the oesophagus where food is stored.
  2. in invertebrates, an expansion of the anterior part of the gut system where food is either digested or stored.
  3. the agricultural or commercial fishery yield.
  4. in ecological terms, the difference between gross annual production and the net production - i.e. the material eaten by predators (or herbivores where the food is a vegetable), including that taken by man, and that consumed by organisms responsible for decay. See STANDING CROP.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a lot of work has been done to compare the performance of zero-tillage under residue based cropping system, information on how different heights of standing rice stubbles affect the performance of no-till techniques is lacking as it is the useful indices of crop yield.
Adopting intercropping all these benefit could be obtained which is not possible by sole cropping and hence food production can be appreciably enlarged, as in intercropped crop's productivity per unit area is superior than sole cropping, with the similar level of supervision and yield benefits can range from 20% to 60% attributed to lessening of pest attack and more resourceful usage of water, nutrients and solar radiation.
Key words: Rice, cropping pattern, leguminous crops, green manuring, soil fertility, sustainable productivity, economics.
* Multiple cropping is the sequential production of two or more different crops from the same field each year.
Chemical attributes of soils subjected to no-till cropping with rye cover crops.
It would appear that specialty crops will continue to be important in the cropping mix in Saskatchewan, and hence, they are becoming 'traditional' rather than 'specialty' or 'minor' crops, which they recently were.
I imagine there was a time when cover cropping was considered conventional.
Under a Ford Foundation grant, it is developing new soil-management and cropping patterns, and conducting studies to identify and alleviate agronomic, marketing, labor and other constraints to small-farm productivity.
Crop rotation has many agronomic economic and environmental benefits compared to monoculture cropping. Crops rotation leads to enhance the soil fertility and help to optimize the water use by crops on sustainable basis i.e.
The easiest way to incorporate cover cropping is the half-and-half strategy: I dedicate every other garden bed to cover crops for an entire year.
All have their advantages and none should be discounted, but cover cropping is the method least likely to be practiced in home gardens.