rotation

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rotation

 [ro-ta´shun]
1. the process of turning around an axis.
2. in obstetrics, the turning of the fetal head (or presenting part) for proper orientation to the pelvic axis. It should occur naturally, but if it does not it must be accomplished manually or instrumentally by the obstetrician or manually by the nurse-midwife.
3. a clinical assignment for students in a specific clinical area.
4. in dentistry, the turning of a malturned tooth into its proper position.
pelvic rotation movement of the pelvis around an imaginary axis.
site rotation the selection of sequential injection locations for a patient receiving multiple injections. A chart is frequently utilized to guide the nurse in rotating sites so that the same location is not used repeatedly, which would lead to tissue damage and irregular absorption of drugs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ro·ta·tion

(rō-tā'shŭn),
1. Turning or movement of a body around its axis.
2. A recurrence in regular order of certain events, such as the symptoms of a periodic disease.
3. In medical education, a period of time on a particular service or specialty.
[L. rotatio, fr. roto, pp. rotatus, to revolve, rotate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rotation

Movement around an axis Graduate education A period of time during which a medical student, or a physician in an early period of his training works in a particular service. See Audition rotation, Clinical rotation, Extern, Intern Obstetrics The turning of a fetus around its long axis such that the presenting part changes. See External rotation, Internal rotation, Limb rotation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ro·ta·tion

(rō-tā'shŭn)
1. Turning or movement around an axis.
2. A recurrence in regular order of certain events, such as the symptoms of a periodic disease.
3. In medical education and other health education progams, a period of time dedicated to a particular service or specialty.
4. Practice of changing hours worked periodically; shift work.
[L. rotatio, fr. roto, pp. rotatus, to revolve, rotate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ro·ta·tion

(rō-tā'shŭn)
Turning or movement of a body around its axis.
[L. rotatio, fr. roto, pp. rotatus, to revolve, rotate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An estimate for the least significant difference mixed model between two crop rotations for each depth separately were obtained using the 'GLIMMIX procedure' in SAS.
In the crop rotation of water spinach after yard long bean, bush bean and winged bean, the maximum water spinach yield (477.05g/m2, 526.54 g/m2 and 674.71 g/m2 respectively) was observed in VC+YLB, VC+BB and VC+WB treatments while the lowest yield was observed in FP+YLB, FP+BB and FP+WB treatments (Table 5).
Mychorrhizal root colonization was significantly (P < 0.05) varied with tillage practices and crop rotations. The maximum root colonization was recorded under PB and ZT which was 18.96 % and 13.86 % higher compared to CT, respectively in rabi season (Fig.
It was found that under all crop rotations accumulation segments had significantly (P [less than or equal to] 0.05) higher SOC content compared with the other slope segments.
Consequently, crop rotation creates the most favorable conditions for reproduction of all groups of microorganisms.
And, if you add one more element to your garden crop rotation, you can reap even bigger benefits: By adding legumes to your crop rotation, you can actually maintain higher nitrogen levels in your soil.
Soil P dynamics within the profile is affected by crop rotation, stubble management, and tillage practices, in part reflecting changes in the organic P (Po) pools (Bunemann et al.
Use an example to describe the differences between continuous cropping and crop rotations.
Semivariogram parameters greatly varied between crop rotations. For example, the sill parameter was higher in sunflower phase (0.172, in 2000-2001) than in wheat phases (0.070 and 0.027, in 1999-2000 and 2001-2002, respectively).
After 5 years of rice-upland crop rotations, soil BD at the 20-30 cm depth was 9% and 12% lower under RUR (1.22 g [cm.sup.-3]) and RUU (1.17 g [cm.sup.-3]) respectively than under RRR (1.33 g [cm.sup.-3]; Fig.
This study was conducted in order to determine how the energy balance affects under different tillage systems and crop rotations in the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey during four year period.