critical

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crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl),
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

critical

(krĭt′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Relating to a medical crisis.
2. Being or relating to a grave physical condition especially of a patient.
3. Relating to the value of a measurement, such as temperature, at which an abrupt change in a chemical of physical quality, property, or state occurs.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

Patient discussion about critical

Q. what is the most critical period of pregnancy where i should be more aware? to the environment , diet ... and things like that...

A. The most critical, is unfortunately, the period with the highest chances of the pregnancy not to be noticed - the first weeks of the pregnancy. During the first eight weeks of pregnancy the various organs of the body develop most substantially, also called organogenesis. This is considered the most sensitive period. However, the fetus may be sensitive to insults during the whole pregnancy, so other periods are not "safe".

you may read more here (www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/birthdefects.html)

Q. when is the most critical time during the pregnancy period?

A. the most critical time is during the whole pregnantcy,the most critical time is the first trimester, but i say the whole pregnantcy is critical,

More discussions about critical
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, the independently submitted papers in this edition of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care (2,3,5) cumulatively describe important factors that affect antibacterial dosing requirements in the critically ill, and highlight that an improved understanding of altered physiology on pharmacokinetics is key to understanding the nuances of antibacterial prescription in this population.
Critically ill patients are also likely to have decreases in their cardiovascular and respiratory reserves as well as neuropathies.
The full article, titled "Chronically Critically Ill Patients: Health-Related Quality of Life and Resource Use After a Disease Management Intervention," is available online at www.ajcconline.org.
"Critically endangered birds represent a very vulnerable part of global biodiversity, and all need urgent action," says Mark Gately of the Wildlife Conservation Society, which is working with BirdLife International to save Cambodia's endangered Bengal Florican.
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: This research study is divided into four phases namely; PHASE 1: A systematic review of the effectiveness of in-hospital psychosocial intervention programmes for families of critically injured patients; PHASE 2: Exploration of the families psychosocial support needs from the perspectives of families and nurses; PHASE 3: Development of in-hospital psychosocial family intervention; and PHASE 4: the implementation of the developed in-hospital psychosocial intervention using a randomised controlled trial.
The low oxygen levels in the blood of high-altitude climbers are similar to those in critically ill patients with severe heart and lung conditions who are on breathing machines, "blue babies" and cystic fibrosis sufferers.
The relatives of the critically ill are comforted by information from those caring for their loved ones.
Military personnel depend critically on their automatic responses to dangerous situations.
"We need to demonstrate that our entire supply chain is secured and that reduction in border wait time as well as the number of inspections has been critically important in terms of us meeting the needs of customers."
Each year, Starlight serves over 250,000 critically, chronically, and terminally ill children throughout New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.
Nicotine replacement therapy was associated with increased hospital mortality in critically ill patients; 20 percent in the nicotine group died, compared with 7 percent of those not in the group.
This material should be approached with an open mind, studied carefully and critically considered."