critical

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crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl),
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

critical

/crit·i·cal/ (krit´ĭ-k'l)
1. pertaining to or of the nature of a crisis.
2. pertaining to a disease or other morbid condition in which there is danger of death.
3. in sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point, as a critical mass.

critical

(krĭt′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Relating to a medical crisis.
2. Being or relating to a grave physical condition especially of a patient.
3. Relating to the value of a measurement, such as temperature, at which an abrupt change in a chemical of physical quality, property, or state occurs.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

crit·i·cal

(krit'ĭ-kăl)
1. Denoting or of the nature of a crisis.
2. Denoting a morbid condition in which death is possible.
3. In sufficient quantity as to constitute a turning point.

critical

1. a point at which one property or state changes to another property or state.
2. pertaining to a crisis in a disease.

critical care
care of a patient in a life-threatening situation of an illness. Includes artificial life support system.
critical care unit
see intensive care unit.
embryological critical period
the period during the life of the embryo, specific for each body system, during which organ genesis takes place.
critical distance
critical point drying
the technique used in preparing tissues for electron microscopy; to eliminate distortion due to surface tension.
critical temperature
the body temperature above which the animal is said to be fevered. See body temperature.

Patient discussion about critical

Q. what is the most critical period of pregnancy where i should be more aware? to the environment , diet ... and things like that...

A. The most critical, is unfortunately, the period with the highest chances of the pregnancy not to be noticed - the first weeks of the pregnancy. During the first eight weeks of pregnancy the various organs of the body develop most substantially, also called organogenesis. This is considered the most sensitive period. However, the fetus may be sensitive to insults during the whole pregnancy, so other periods are not "safe".

you may read more here (www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/birthdefects.html)

Q. when is the most critical time during the pregnancy period?

A. the most critical time is during the whole pregnantcy,the most critical time is the first trimester, but i say the whole pregnantcy is critical,

More discussions about critical
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Wardle believes that the critic writes "simultaneously for today's theatre-goer and tomorrow's theatre historian" (13).
But his crystalline narrative method, the very hallmark of the public critic and literary journalist, is refined by his acute literary judgment' (124).