cricothyroid muscle


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cri·co·thy·roid mus·cle

[TA]
intrinsic laryngeal muscle; origin, anterior surface of arch of cricoid; insertion, the anterior or straight part passes upward to ala of thyroid; the posterior or oblique part passes more outward to inferior horn of thyroid; action, acts at cricothyroid joint, pulling anterior aspects of thyroid and cricoid cartilages together, rotating the superior portion of the cricoid lamina and arytenoid cartilages posteriorly, causing vocal folds to tense, increasing the pitch of voice tone; the antagonist of this movement is the thyroarytenoid muscle; nerve supply, external laryngeal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (from vagus).
Synonym(s): musculus cricothyroideus [TA]

cri·co·thy·roid mus·cle

(krī'kō-thī'royd mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
Origin, anterior surface of arch of cricoid; insertion, the anterior or straight part passes upward to ala of thyroid; the posterior or oblique part passes more outward to inferior horn of thyroid; action, makes vocal folds tense, increasing the pitch of voice tone; nerve supply, external laryngeal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (from vagus).
Synonym(s): musculus cricothyroideus [TA] .

cricothyroid muscle

Laryngeal muscle. Origin: cricoid cartilage. Insertion: lower edges of thyroid cartilage. Nerve: superior laryngeal of the vagus (CN X). Action: tenses (stretches) vocal cords
See: thyroidfor illus.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
For EBSLN monitoring, needle electrodes are placed into the cricothyroid muscle and sutured into place (figure 2).
At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle .
The cricothyroid muscle does not influence vocal fold position in laryngeal paralysis.
He noted that in transferring from heavy to light registrations, there was always a lessening of activity in the vocalis and cricothyroid muscles.
The vocalis muscle is dominant over the cricothyroid muscle.
It was of particular interest to investigate the firing rate of the laryngeal motor neuron pool in the cricothyroid muscle when the fundamental frequency varied during vibrato.
The cricothyroid muscle receives innervation from the superior laryngeal nerve.
The cricothyroid muscle works in opposition to the vocal folds (thyroarytenoids), controlling the position of the thyroid cartilage in relation to the cricoid cartilage and, more importantly for singing, controlling pitch.
Occasionally, the extralaryngeal muscles and the cricothyroid muscles are injected to improve the tremor.
The cricothyroid muscles are perhaps the most poorly exercised.
It is an isometric exercise for the thyroarytenoid and the cricothyroid muscles, the two muscles that control pitch and register.