cricothyroid muscle


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cri·co·thy·roid mus·cle

[TA]
intrinsic laryngeal muscle; origin, anterior surface of arch of cricoid; insertion, the anterior or straight part passes upward to ala of thyroid; the posterior or oblique part passes more outward to inferior horn of thyroid; action, acts at cricothyroid joint, pulling anterior aspects of thyroid and cricoid cartilages together, rotating the superior portion of the cricoid lamina and arytenoid cartilages posteriorly, causing vocal folds to tense, increasing the pitch of voice tone; the antagonist of this movement is the thyroarytenoid muscle; nerve supply, external laryngeal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (from vagus).
Synonym(s): musculus cricothyroideus [TA]

cri·co·thy·roid mus·cle

(krī'kō-thī'royd mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
Origin, anterior surface of arch of cricoid; insertion, the anterior or straight part passes upward to ala of thyroid; the posterior or oblique part passes more outward to inferior horn of thyroid; action, makes vocal folds tense, increasing the pitch of voice tone; nerve supply, external laryngeal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (from vagus).
Synonym(s): musculus cricothyroideus [TA] .

cricothyroid muscle

Laryngeal muscle. Origin: cricoid cartilage. Insertion: lower edges of thyroid cartilage. Nerve: superior laryngeal of the vagus (CN X). Action: tenses (stretches) vocal cords
See: thyroidfor illus.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
Guily, "Electromyographic activity of strap and cricothyroid muscles in pitch change," Acta Oto-Laryngologica, vol.
EBSLN monitoring was achieved by placing and suturing needle electrodes into the cricothyroid muscle. An electrophysiologist was present throughout all 4 of the operations reported herein.
Here it descends along the pharyngeal constrictors and is usually closely associated with the superior thyroid artery which crosses medially to supply the cricothyroid muscle. Activation of the cricothyroid muscle results in elongation, stiffening, and thinning of the vocal cords during phonation and plays an important role in controlling vocal fundamental frequency.
At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle ...
The cricothyroid muscle does not influence vocal fold position in laryngeal paralysis.
He noted that in transferring from heavy to light registrations, there was always a lessening of activity in the vocalis and cricothyroid muscles. It appeared to him that, as long as the vocalis muscles (thyroarytenoids) were involved in production, the voice stayed in the modal (lower, chest, etc.) register.
The vocalis muscle is dominant over the cricothyroid muscle.
ends of notes; however, it is customary for classical singers to use the vibrato continually when singing." (8) Western culture uses a vibrato that requires the cricothyroid muscle in the larynx to produce pulsating contractions.
If the weakness is severe, there can be a tilt of the larynx towards the side of the weakened superior laryngeal nerve and/or cricothyroid muscle. The larynx tilts toward the side of the weakness on lengthening because the cricothyroid muscle on the normal side pulls the thyroid cartilage anteriorly (forward) and down toward the cricoid cartilage; the paretic cricothyroid muscle is weak and pulls the thyroid cartilage to a lesser degree, resulting in tilting of the larynx towards the side of the weak superior laryngeal nerve and cricothyroid muscle.
Mason and Zemlin revealed through electromyographic analysis that vibrato is caused by the cricothyroid muscle. (1) The cricothyroid muscle controls pitch in phonation by stretching the vocal folds (thyroarytenoids).
6) A higher ratio of thyroarytenoid muscle activation to cricothyroid muscle activation during and after use of the semi-occluded postures.
Occasionally, the extralaryngeal muscles and the cricothyroid muscles are injected to improve the tremor.