cricoid pressure


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cricoid pressure

The application of manual pressure onto the cricoid cartilage during intubation and mechanical ventilation. This technique helps to occlude the esophagus and prevent the entry of air into the gastrointestinal tract during ventilation. It also diminishes the chances for regurgitation from the stomach and aspiration of gastric contents.
See also: pressure
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The results were different because of various factors, such as differences in the anatomic features of obese patients and obese parturient, cricoid pressure application, head position, degree of muscle relaxation, and the type or size of the laryngoscope blade used.
Cricoid pressure in emergency rapid sequence induction.
Before the administration of general anesthetic, all patients must be thoroughly evaluated, receive aspiration prophylaxis and cricoid pressure, and be positioned in optimal position for intubation.
There is inadequate evidence to recommend the routine use of cricoid pressure when intubating a child or infant with cardiac arrest.
Anaesthesia UK 2004 Cricoid pressure Available from: www.frca.co.uk/article.aspx?articleid=343 [Accessed February 2012]
"The bottom line is there's no concern about cricoid pressure leading to necrosis.
Additionally, they no longer endorse the routine use of cricoid pressure during airway management.
Patients in the groups above should be anaesthetised with necessary precautions to prevent aspiration, including awake intubation or rapid sequence induction with application of cricoid pressure.
Left uterine displacement is necessary, as is application of cricoid pressure to avoid aspiration.