cricoid pressure


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cricoid pressure

a technique to reduce the risk of the aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia. The cricoid cartilage is pushed against the body of the sixth cervical vertebra, compressing the esophagus to prevent passive regurgitation. The technique cannot, however, stop active vomiting. Cricoid pressure is applied before intubation, immediately after injection of anesthetic drugs, and as a part of "rapid sequence" intubation. Once a mainstay of aspiration prevention, the effectiveness of this technique has recently been called into question. Cricoid pressure may also be used to move the larynx posteriorly to facilitate visualization during laryngoscopy. Also called Sellick's maneuver.
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Cricoid pressure

cricoid pressure

The application of manual pressure onto the cricoid cartilage during intubation and mechanical ventilation. This technique helps to occlude the esophagus and prevent the entry of air into the gastrointestinal tract during ventilation. It also diminishes the chances for regurgitation from the stomach and aspiration of gastric contents.
See also: pressure

cricoid pressure (krīˑ·koid preˑ·sher),

n technique used during general anesthesia to lessen the possibility of stomach content aspiration. The practitioner squeezes the cricoid cartilage against the sixth cervical vertebra to stop passive regurgitation. Does not work with active vomiting, however. Also called
Sellick's maneuver.
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Cricoid pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
A patient aspirated into the lungs during bowel obstruction surgery after a scrub nurse released cricoid pressure to retrieve a fallen suction device.
This study was approved by the Human Research and Ethics Committee of Peninsula Health and was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register on 23 September 2009 as "Blinded off line assessment of the effects of cricoid pressure with video assisted laryngoscopy in patients using a C-MAC" (ACTRN1260900080932279).
Owen et al (2002) remarked that cricoid pressure can be seen in medical literature from the 18th century.
On repeat attempt, the cricoid pressure was released which resulted in regurgitation of clear fluid from stomach which was collected in pharynx only.
The advantages and disadvantages should be identified, as well as the barriers preventing effective application of cricoid pressure.
Traditional management of general anaesthesia for caesarean section focuses on rapid attainment of adequate depth of anaesthesia, with provision of cricoid pressure and endotracheal intubation.
number of attempts, number of additional clinicians, number of alternative techniques, glottis exposure Cormack & Lehane definition, lifting force applied during laryngoscopy, need for cricoid pressure, and position of vocal cords at intubation.
0mm cuffed oral Endo tracheal tube, maintaining cricoid pressure throughout.
The authors describe a modified rapid sequence induction, including pharyngoscopy with a Macintosh laryngoscope, instrumentation with Magill forceps for insertion of a 14 FG gastric tube into the oesophagus, and temporary release of cricoid pressure.
The application of cricoid pressure is a frequently utilised technique to provide the anaesthetised and paralysed patient with some protection from passive regurgitation.