cricoarytenoid

cricoarytenoid

 [kri″ko-ar″ĭ-te´noid]
pertaining to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cri·co·ar·y·te·noid

(krī'kō-ar'i-tē'noyd),
Relating to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cri·co·ar·y·te·noid

(krī'kō-ar-i-tē'noyd)
Relating to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Upper airway manifestations include rheumatoid nodules on the vocal cords, vasculitis affecting the recurrent laryngeal or vagus nerve leading to vocal cord paralysis, or arthritis of the cricoarytenoid joint.
Additional work is needed to clarify the rotational dynamics of the arytenoid cartilage and cricoarytenoid joint and to develop techniques with abilities to measure movements in this region objectively.
In addition, posterior and lateral cricoarytenoid muscle preservation with normal recurrent laryngeal nerve function during SCPL can be beneficial for neoglottic functions postoperatively.
We conclude that CT can be useful for assessing radiologic changes in the cricoarytenoid joint in elderly patients during the workup of dysphonia and abnormal movement of the vocal folds.
proposed this procedure in 1984.[2] Endoscopic laser surgery had commonly been used but could result in the formation of granulation tissue leading to renarrowing of the airway or excessive enlargement of the glottic lumen which was irreversible.[3] Most of the laser surgery actually ablated partial arytenoid cartilage, large proportion of vocal ligament, and the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle to achieve enlargement of the glottic lumen.[3],[4],[5] The cricoarytenoid joint (CAJ) and CAJ fixation (CAJF) were often developed after the first session of laser surgery.
The second is transecting the insertion of the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle from the muscular process and entering the cricoarytenoid (CA) joint to debride part of the articular cartilage and facilitate ankylosis of the CA joint.
Dysphagia and odynophagia are secondary to inflammation of the cricoarytenoid joints.
Laryngeal involvement with cricoarytenoid joint alterations can be found in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and gout.
Among the topics are speech-language pathology and the professional voice user: an overview, amateur and professional child singers: pedagogy and related issues, psychiatric manifestation of medications prescribed commonly in otolaryngology, cricoarytenoid and cricothyroid joint injury: evaluation and treatment, and nursing considerations in the care of the professional voice.
Sorantin, "Biomechanics of the cricoarytenoid joint: three-dimensional imaging and vector analysis," Journal of Voice, vol.
Most of these studies have focused on pacing of vocalis muscles for bilateral VCP; for example, electrical stimulus to the paralyzed posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles in human larynx has induced vocal fold abduction and restored ventilation through the glottis in case of bilateral laryngeal paralysis [1719].