crick


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Crick

(krik),
Francis H.C., British biochemist and Nobel laureate, 1916-2004. See: Watson-Crick helix.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

crick

(krĭk)
n.
A painful cramp or muscle spasm, as in the back or neck.
tr.v. cricked, cricking, cricks
To cause a painful cramp or muscle spasm in by turning or wrenching.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

crick

(krĭk)
A muscle spasm or cramp, esp. in the neck.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Crick, who also is helping set up the Labor Day cruise at Accelaquarter, said many of the people involved with the track, which changed ownership at various times during its history, have committed to being present for the festivities that day.
Mr Crick asked the Prime Minister: "Mrs May, you're about to visit Robben Island -- you were active in politics in the 70s and 80s: what did you do to help release Nelson Mandela?"
Prof Crick, 36, has previously advised the Office of the Chief Scientific Adviser for Wales and is currently an expert adviser to the Welsh Government and chair of the recently-announced National Network for Excellence in Science & Technology, a PS4m investment by the Welsh Government.
Over a five-year period, researchers from AstraZeneca and the Crick will work together on early-stage research that could go on to help create new treatments and health innovations in the future.
"Tell Crick you can do your piece to camera when I have finished."
Channel 4 News political correspondent Crick marched up to the press officer and called his name.
When it opens next year, the Crick will see more than 1,200 scientists coming under one roof to accelerate the rate of progress in tackling the major diseases, such as cancer, facing the global population.
Bloom tried to play down his remarks about women, saying his comments were a joke but he has not publicly apologised to Crick.
This "old boy's club" also included Watson and Crick. It also included Maurice Wilkins, a colleague of Franklin at King's College, who had a thinly-veiled, and well-known, turf war going on with her.
Crick's letter describes to his son how he and James Watson found the copying mechanism "by which life comes from life." It includes a simple sketch of DNA's double helix structure which Crick concedes he can't draw very well.
Crick had used the handwritten note, dated March 19 1953, to tell his 12-year-old son Michael that he and his colleague Jim Watson had "probably" made the "most important discovery."