creosote

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creosote

 [kre´o-sōt]
a mixture of phenols from wood tar, formerly used as an expectorant and external antiseptic and now mainly used as a wood preservative. A mixture of the carbonates of various constituents of creosote (creosote carbonate) is used as an expectorant and antiseptic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cre·o·sote

(krē'ō-sōt),
A mixture of phenols (chiefly methyl guaiacol, guaiacol, and creosol) obtained during the distillation of wood-tar, preferably that derived from beechwood; used as a disinfectant and wood preservative.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

creosote

(krē′ə-sōt′)
n.
1. A colorless to yellowish oily liquid containing phenols and creosols, obtained by the destructive distillation of wood tar, especially from the wood of a beech, and formerly used as an expectorant in treating chronic bronchitis.
2. A yellowish to greenish-brown oily liquid containing phenols and creosols, obtained from coal tar and used as a wood preservative and disinfectant. It can cause severe neurological disturbances if inhaled in strong concentrations.
tr.v. creo·soted, creo·soting, creo·sotes
To treat or paint with creosote.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cre·o·sote

(krēŏ-sōt)
A mixture of phenols (chiefly methyl guaiacol, guaiacol, and creosol) obtained during the distillation of wood-tar, preferably that derived from beechwood; used as a disinfectant and wood preservative.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cre·o·sote

(krēŏ-sōt)
A mixture of phenols obtained during distillation of wood-tar; used as a disinfectant.
[G. kreas, flesh, + sōtēr, preserver]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The decreasing trend in residual creosote from the pith to the surface of 5- and 25-year poles is mainly due to the effect of bleeding and leaching of creosote during service [6,9,14,15,17].
Weathering, which caused a reduction in creosote content (Figs.
4) since the creosote content near the surface was high (Figs.
It is interesting to note that the fungus-induced weight loss was negligible at creosote contents above the 14 percent level (Fig.
Because there are significant numbers of individuals who have previously been exposed or are currently experiencing occupational and environmental exposures to coal tar creosote, the potential health effects of these exposures warrant attention.
In: Toxicological Profile for Wood Creosote, Coal Tar Creosote, Coal Tar, Coal Tar Pitch, and Coal Tar Pitch Volatiles.
The carcinogenicity of creosote oil: its role in the induction of skin tumors in mice.
Epitheliema of skin after prolonged exposure to creosote. Br Med J 1:368.
Recent developments in wood preservation creosote. Rec.
Pigment emulsified creosote: An alternative to high temperature creosote.
High temperature creosote content: 64.7% m/m [+ or -] 2% Water-phase components: 30.0% m/m [+ or -] 2% [a] Pre-dispersed pigment content: 3.5% m/m [+ or -] 1% [b] Non-distillable components: 1.8% m/[m.sup.c] pH: 9 to 11 Density at 20[degrees]C: 1.08 kg/L minimum Typical viscosity (50[degrees]C, 210 [S.sup.-1]): 11 to 21 mPa.s Surface tension at 20[degrees]C: [less than]35 mN/m
(a.)HTC = high temperature creosote; PEC = pigment emulsified creosote.