Crashworthiness

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That attribute of a motor vehicle which allows the occupants involved in a crash to survive without injury
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MB America is responsible for the manufacture and assembly of escape systems and crashworthy seats for the US Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and Army.
That's why the program office has been working closely with the fleet to determine the optimal dimensions, features and functionality for the new seat, said Lindley Bark, head of the crashworthy and escape systems branch.
Successful sled testing will make certain that the seating system is crashworthy under frontal impact conditions.
To comply with WC19, a wheelchair must perform well in a frontal crash test similar to the federal tests used to make sure vehicle seats, seatbelts, and child safety seats are crashworthy. The crash test simulates a frontal impact that is more severe than approximately 97 percent of frontal crashes.
I now work for Martin-Baker America, a company that builds ejection and crashworthy seats for our military.
Automotive News noted that Li-ion batteries have a higher voltage, power density and energy density than NiMH batteries, but have a "short-circuit problem" and are not yet "crashworthy."
It attributed declining fatalities in passenger cars and injuries to more crashworthy vehicles and increases in safety belt use.
CAFE kills people by forcing manufacturers to make vehicles smaller and therefore less crashworthy than they otherwise would be.
Besides requiring a thin-walled part that could be welded during production, Audi needed a B-pillar that would be crashworthy, have minimum distortion, and improve production and cost efficiencies.
"The analysis of the court of appeals indicates the duty to make crashworthy vehicles preexists the sale of the car," Profeta said.
Armanios and Dancila also see potential applications in the reinforcement of tethers, mountain-climbing ropes, and crashworthy helicopter seat restraints.