craniometry


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craniometry

 [kra″ne-om´ĕ-tre]
a branch of anthropometry, being the measurement of the dimensions and angles of a bony skull.

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē),
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]

craniometry

/cra·ni·om·e·try/ (kra″ne-om´ah-tre) the scientific measurement of the dimensions of the bones of the skull and face.craniomet´ric

craniometry

(krā′nē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
Measurement of the skull to determine its characteristics as related to sex, race, or body type.

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē)
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]
Enlarge picture
CRANIOMETRIC POINTS: These are the fixed points of the skull used in craniometry: 1) acanthion; 2) asterion; 3) basion; 4) bregma; 5) condylion; 6) coronion or koronion; 7) crotaphion; 8) dacryon; 9) entomion; 10) glabella or metopion; 11) gnathion; 12) gonion; 13) infradentale; 14) inion; 15) jugale; 6) koronion; 16) mastoidale; 10) metopion; 17) nasion; 18) obelion; 19) opisthion; 20) orbitale; 21) pogonion; 22) porion; 23) prosthion; 24) pterion; 25) rhinion; 26) sphenion; 27) stephanion; 28) symphysion; 29) zygion; 30) zygomaxillary point.

craniometry

(krā-nē-ŏm′ĕ-trē) [″ + metron, measure]
Study of the skull and measurement of its bones.
See: illustration

cra·ni·om·e·try

(krā'nē-om'ĕ-trē)
Measurement of the dry skull after removal of the soft parts and study of its topography.
[cranio- + G. metron, measure]

craniometry (krā´nēom´ətrē),

n the study of the measurements of the skull.

craniometry

a branch of morphometry, being the measurement of the dimensions and angles of a bony skull.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the author's words "the skull [became] the founding and central document of not just phrenology and craniometry but psychology and anthropology and criminology and psychiatry.
In this sense, as Schiebinger indicates, skull size or craniometry as an index of relative intelligence and racial difference simply were displaced by IQ tests and the science of interpreting these scores in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
39) One must not underestimate, then, the potency of the confluence of factors that informed the milieu in which Ella Deloria and Zora Neale Hurston worked: "Political debates over slavery, naturalization law, and immigration drew on the sciences of anthropology and craniometry, but these bodies of knowledge had arisen in answer to questions about peoplehood generated by the politics of exploration, expansion, colonialism, slavery, and republicanism in the first place.
Craniometry, the leading numerical science of biological determinism, was replaced by molecular anthropology, which used genetic evidence to map human lineages through genetic markers.
The practice of craniometry in the nineteenth century (Gould, Ever Since Darwin 243f.
In the nineteenth century Italian anthropologist Cesare Lombroso, scorned by Harvard University biologist Stephen Jay Gould for his support of the pseudoscience of craniometry, was an early advocate of eugenics.
Reason itself is the target of satire in Ghosh's first novel The Circle of Reason through the faith that one of the protagonists, Balaram, places in phrenology and craniometry in the first half and through the scientific socialism of his nephew, Alu, in the second half.
Through these institutions, scientists attempted to increase farm productivity, delivered popular scientific lectures, published Scientific American and Science, campaigned to rid cities of germs and to introduce laboratory science into secondary schools, and even, unfortunately, to promote patent medicines and craniometry.
The editors steer clear of the familiar narrative of craniometry and eugenics, and emphasize other fields among the natural and social sciences: natural history, genetics, anthropology, medicine, and sociology.