craniology

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cra·ni·ol·o·gy

(krā'nē-ol'ō-jē),
The science concerned with variations in size, shape, and proportion of the cranium, especially with the variations characterizing the different races of humans.
[cranio- + G. logos, study]

craniology

(krā′nē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the characteristics of the skull, such as size and shape, especially in humans.

cra′ni·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
cra′ni·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
cra′ni·ol′o·gist n.

craniology

[krā′nē·ol′əjē,]
the study of the shape, size, proportions, and other features of the human skull. It is usually associated with anthropological research.

cra·ni·ol·o·gy

(krānē-olŏ-jē)
The science concerned with variations in size, shape, and proportion of the cranium, especially with the variations characterizing the different races of humans.

cra·ni·ol·o·gy

(krānē-olŏ-jē)
The science concerned with variations in size, shape, and proportion of the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Craniological theories of inequality influenced Milne-Edwards well into the 1880s.
79) The change from the highly articulate monster of Shelley's creation into the mute horror pursued by villagers, the manufactured zombie with a deformed and criminal brain, is another later interpretation, reflecting perhaps the craniological and neurological concerns of mid-nineteenth-century science, as well as the requirements of stage and film sensationalism.
And quite rightly so, since the "old doctor's" interests in measuring his patients' heads with a "thing like callipers" clearly shows that he follows, a la lettre [to the letter], the notorious craniological theory of Cesare Lombroso--an Italian jurist who considered that criminal tendencies were innate in individuals, and that criminals could be recognized by the shape of their heads (Heart 15).