craniectomy

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craniectomy

 [kra″ne-ek´to-me]
excision of a segment of the skull.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cra·ni·ec·to·my

(krā'nē-ek'tō-mē),
Excision of a portion of the skull, without replacement of the bone (for example, subtemporal or suboccipital).
[G. kranion, skull, + ektomē, excision]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

craniectomy

(krā′nē-ĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. craniecto·mies
Surgical removal of a portion of the cranium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

craniectomy

Neurosurgery The surgical excision of bone to access the brain. See Metal plate in the head.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cra·ni·ec·to·my

(krā'nē-ek'tŏ-mē)
Excision of a portion of the skull.
[G. kranion, skull, + ektomē, excision]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This should not be a problem in large craniectomies but would contribute to inaccuracies in small craniectomies.
CSF leakage occurred in 7/50 (14%) cases of retrosigmoid sur-geries for Cerebellopontine (CP) Angle SOLs, 12/59 (20.3%) cases of midline suboccipital craniectomies for 4th ventricle/cerebellar SOLs, 4/12 (33.3%) cases of foramen magnum SOLs, and 2/6 (33.3%) cases of chiari malformations.
Overall, in the patient cohort presented here (60 consecutive decompressive craniectomies performed in the context of severe TBI between 2005 and 2011), a favourable functional outcome was observed in 50% of cases.
The results of this study therefore encourage us to perform fewer immediate decompressive craniectomies in patients with a very severe traumatic brain injury (initial Glasgow score <5 and bilateral fixed dilated pupils).
The numbers of endoscopic procedures and decompressive craniectomies performed decreased inversely as the numbers of years in specialist practice increased.
Various surgeries that were performed included wound debridement, suturing of scalp lacerations, craniotomies, elevation of depressed skull fractures and craniectomies. Follow-up of all the patients with Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) determination was done 6 months after the injury.
Of the total, 709(63.9%) patients were treated conservatively, while 381(36.1%) patients underwent operative management; and 256 (24.2%) had minor operative treatment for scalp lacerations, which were treated with surgical suturing and patients were prescribed antibiotics, analgesics and tetanus toxoid booster doses; 125 (11.8%) had major operations which included craniotomies, craniectomies and treatment for different fractures (Table-4).
DISCUSSION: Common indication for decompressive craniectomies include traumatic brain injuries following road traffic accidents.
In 1890, Lannelongue treated sagittal synostosis with bilateral strip craniectomies (Lannelongue, 1890).
Early management of craniosynostosis using endoscopic assisted strip craniectomies and cranial orthotic molding therapy.
Assessing the neurological outcome of traumatic acute subdural hematoma patients with and without primary decompressive craniectomies. Acta Neurochir Suppl 2010; 106: 235-7.