cracklings


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cracklings

proteinaceous residues after fat is melted and run off during offal processing. Called also greaves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mercado, who hails from this town, brought chicharon made in this town, a major producer of pork cracklings.
What a wonderful thing to eat: flesh bread with swirls of cracklings
Nancy, I can almost taste your mom's crackling bread, and I bet she knew what many folks are relearning today: Real, whole foods were the best for her family.
One tweet mentioned a certain pub in south London that had just started serving an amazing range of modern pub snacks, the best of which almost made me book a ticket down to King's Cross immediately; it was a small pot of pork cracklings served with a dip of freshly-made tart apple sauce.
In this recipe I've made a nice sweet/salty marinade in which to steep and cook the pork, and we're taking the rind off to begin with, so we can make the cracklings to dip into a little pot of sharp home-made apple sauce.
The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook: The Global Migration of African Cuisine by Diane M.
1/2 pound crisp cracklings, broken into 1/2-inch pieces (see Note)
NOTE: Cracklings are called chicharrones in Spanish and can be found in Latino grocery stores.
Spivey takes a different approach in The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook, a search for political and cultural meaning in food that attempts to correct the "insensitivity and blatant misinformation" about t he history of African cuisines.
Spivey, The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook.
In winter, after the hogs were slaughtered, it would be flavored with cracklings (bits of pork fat or skin left after the pork is rendered).
50), a dish of thick medallions of moist roasted pork loin wrapped in crackling and paired with white beans and escarole plus a piqTuant green sauce.