coxofemoral

(redirected from coxofemoral joint)

coxofemoral

 [kok″so-fem´o-ral]
pertaining to the hip and thigh.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cox·o·fem·o·ral

(koks'ō-fem'ŏ-răl),
Relating to the hip bone and the femur.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cox·o·fem·o·ral

(kok'sō-fem'ŏr-ăl)
Relating to the hip bone and the femur.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
To take into accout of the above mentioned amendments, the appreciation of the difficulty elements is made by reference to: the height and fixation of the shape of the jumps and the degree of opening the coxofemoral joint (the amplitude of the movement), it is difficult to achieve the incremental increase of the bodily difficulties.
Hip dysplasia (HD) is a common orthopedic disease that affects mainly median and large breed dogs and is characterized by subluxation of the coxofemoral joint (hip laxity) with subsequent degenerative changes manifested by pain and lameness (TOMLINSON & COOK, 2002).
The avian coxofemoral joint: a review of regional anatomy and report of an open-reduction technique for repair of a coxofemoral luxation.
Subsequent MRI scans of both hips revealed altered signal intensities in the right femoral head and neck with low signal intensities on T1-weighted sequences (Figures 1,2) and high signal intensities on T2-weighted sequences (Figure 3), and this suggested diffuse bone marrow edema, and a large effusion was seen in the right coxofemoral joint. Whole body bone mineral densitometry (BMD) was normal.
A 26-year-old Italian Caucasian male had a trauma from a fall on July 2014, with multiple fractures including left hemipelvis with luxation of coxofemoral joint (managed with reduction and osteosynthesis of the posterior acetabular wall), distal third of the right femur (treated with an osteosynthesis with plate and screws), and distal diaphysis of the right fibula (osteosynthesis plate and screws) along with facial skull trauma and chest trauma.
New concepts of coxofemoral joint stability and the development of a clinical stres-radiographic method for quantitating hip joint laxity in the dog.
MRI confirmed the lesion and its extension to the left coxofemoral joint and to the obturator internus muscle (Figure 2), its heterogeneous nature, comprising both liquidous and tissular phases, and revealed a hypersignal inside the bone where the lesion laid.
It perforated the pectineus muscle and the articular capsule of the coxofemoral joint. There is risk of injury to the femoral vessels due to its lateral proximity with a mean distance of 2.14 [+ or -] 0.35 cm for the femoral artery and 1.71 [+ or -] 0.55 cm for the femoral vein (FV); the obturator nerve (ON) is located 0.87 [+ or -] 0.62 cm inferior and lateral to the portal (Table I).
The fulcrum of the goniometer was placed at the lateral of the coxofemoral joint. The fixed arm of the goniometer was aligned with the axis of the femur by using the greater trochanter as a reference point.
After improvement of her intestinal condition, the patient returned to seek medical attention due to intense arthralgia in the right coxofemoral joint, as well as low back pain with significant functional limitation.
The conditions associated with coxofemoral joint includes fracture of acetabulum, luxation of hip, capital femoral physeal fracture, fracture of femoral head and neck, hip dysplasia or Legg-Calve-Perth's disease and degenerative changes which prevents stabilization of hip and osteoarthritis.