coxa valga


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cox·a val·'ga

alteration of the angle made by the axis of the femoral neck to the axis of the femoral shaft, so that the angle exceeds 135 degrees; the femoral neck is in more of a straight-line relationship to the shaft of the femur.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coxa valga

(văl′gə)
n.
Deformity of the hip in which the angle made by the femoral neck and the femoral shaft is increased.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coxa valga

Orthopedics A hip deformity in which the angle between the neck and the shaft of the femur is > 140º
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cox·a val·ga

(kok'să val'gă)
Alteration of the angle made by the axis of the femoral neck to the axis of the femoral shaft, so that the angle exceeds 135 degrees; the femoral neck is in more of a straight-line relationship to the shaft of the femur.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Coxa valga is commonly associated with chronic hip instability in patients with neuromuscular conditions such as cerebral palsy.
It has also been hypothesized that coxa valga may contribute to the dysplasia [5, 26, 30].
(2) Bilateral coxa valga. Case 3 Left hip subluxation Acetabular fossa and secondary to femoral neck, anterior femoral neck.
Both patients had the same Pipkin type-IV fracture and coxa valga: femoral neck angle was 160[degrees] in case 1 and 159[degrees] in case 2.
Reports of avascular necrosis of femoral head, coxa valga have been reported with interlocking nail when attempted in skeletally immature patients.
Frontal view of the femurs revealed enlarged acetabular cavities with rough margins, and poorly formed femoral epiphyses and widened femoral necks with coxa valga (Fig.
Of the 20 hips with secondary osteoarthritis, the etiology was trauma in 12, dysplasia of the hip in five, slipped capital femoral epiphysis in two, and coxa valga in one.
Rigid intramedullary nailing may damage the blood supply to the femoral head resulting in AVN or causing growth arrest at the greater trochanter resulting in coxa valga. They were not advised for children.