cowpox


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Related to cowpox: cowpox vaccine

cowpox

 [kow´poks]
a mild pustular eruption affecting milk cows, usually confined to the udder and teats, caused by the vaccinia virus, and transmissible to humans. Edward Jenner, in the 18th century, discovered that cowpox could be transmitted to humans who milked or tended cattle, and also noted that persons who contracted it in this way seldom contracted smallpox. This discovery led to vaccination against smallpox.

cowpox

/cow·pox/ (kou´poks) a mild eruptive disease of milk cows, confined to the udder and teats, due to cowpox virus, and transmissible to humans.

cowpox

(kou′pŏks′)
n.
A mild contagious skin disease of cattle, usually affecting the udder, that is caused by a virus and characterized by the eruption of a pustular rash. When the virus is transmitted to humans, as by vaccination, it can confer immunity to smallpox. Also called vaccinia.

cowpox

[kou′poks]
Etymology: AS, cu + ME, pokkes
a mild infectious disease characterized by a pustular rash, caused by the vaccinia virus. Animals that carry the vaccinia virus are cows, cats, and rodents. Human cases are usually rare. Transmission to humans can occur during the milking of a cow with active lesions on the udder and teats, but the disease is usually transmitted by domesticated cats. Cowpox infection usually confers immunity to smallpox, because of the similarity of the variola and vaccinia viruses. Also called cat pox. See also smallpox, vaccinia.

cowpox

A mild disease of cows' udders and teats that can be transmitted to people, doing manual milking. It causes skin blisters and confers immunity against SMALLPOX-a somewhat academic consideration now that this disease has been eradicated. Jenner's observations on cowpox led to vaccination and the science of immunology. (Edward Jenner, 1749–1823, English physician).

cowpox

a benign, contagious disease of cows characterized by the appearance of pox lesions on the teat and udder skin. The causative virus is in the genus Orthopoxvirus. Typical lesions are a patch of erythema, then a papule, followed by a vesicle, then a pustule and finally a scab. The disease is transmissible to humans and is now rare.

cowpox virus
a poxvirus which is antigenically distinct from vaccinia virus and pseudocowpox virus. The characteristics of the virus are otherwise identical with the vaccinia virus. See also vaccinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chasing Jenner's vaccine: revisiting cowpox virus classification.
First, there is the customary factual knowledge (and belief) amongst the local farming community that dairymaids already infected with cowpox became immune to smallpox.
Louis Pasteur honored Jenner by coining the process "vaccination", for the vaccinia virus of cowpox (vache, a cow in French).
The publication of Kaitai Shinsho not only helped Japanese physicians correctly diagnose and treat their patients--even physicians who relied primarily on Chinese medical knowledge--but also led to other advances, most notably the embrace of Jennerian cowpox vaccination.
This study ("Poxvirus infection in a cat with presumptive human transmission," Veterinary Dermatology, 2011) describes a case of cowpox infection in a cat and transmission to a caretaker.
To him, such persons are all indistinguishable from the anti-smallpox vaccine activists in Britain, who warned that children would start behaving like cows if they received vaccine made from cowpox lesions.
Other choices include the Longthorpe Tower in Peterborough, where the Middle Ages linger on in the form of a chamber rediscovered after the Second World War, decorated with murals that cover all aspects of medieval existence (the accompanying text adopts the refreshing perspective of encouraging the viewer to see how different people used to be, rather than drawing out the similarities); and Gloucestershire's Edward Jenner Museum, which commemorates the first attempts at vaccination, when Jenner, intrigued by local lore that claimed those who caught cowpox were rendered immune to smallpox, injected his gardener's son with the former, to check the tale's veracity.
Vaccines have been a part of medical care since the English physician Edward Jenner deliberately exposed a young boy to infectious material from cowpox blisters to prevent the disease more than 200 years ago.
He hypothesized this would protect against smallpox because milkmaids infected with cowpox never caught smallpox, even during epidemics.
Which scientist discovered vaccination and used cowpox injections to cure smallpox?
The viruses are the same cowpox virus that forms the basis of the smallpox vaccine and a bird virus called fowlpox.