cowpox


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Related to cowpox: cowpox vaccine

cowpox

 [kow´poks]
a mild pustular eruption affecting milk cows, usually confined to the udder and teats, caused by the vaccinia virus, and transmissible to humans. Edward Jenner, in the 18th century, discovered that cowpox could be transmitted to humans who milked or tended cattle, and also noted that persons who contracted it in this way seldom contracted smallpox. This discovery led to vaccination against smallpox.

cowpox

(kou′pŏks′)
n.
A mild contagious skin disease of cattle, usually affecting the udder, that is caused by a virus and characterized by the eruption of a pustular rash. When the virus is transmitted to humans, as by vaccination, it can confer immunity to smallpox. Also called vaccinia.

cowpox

A mild disease of cows' udders and teats that can be transmitted to people, doing manual milking. It causes skin blisters and confers immunity against SMALLPOX-a somewhat academic consideration now that this disease has been eradicated. Jenner's observations on cowpox led to vaccination and the science of immunology. (Edward Jenner, 1749–1823, English physician).
References in periodicals archive ?
All 5 case-patients were negative for cowpox virus, monkeypox virus, F.
After seeing their GP, they were sent to the Countess of Chester Hospital, where he was diagnosed with cowpox.
Dr Aysha Javed - who diagnosed the boy - said it was the first case of cowpox she had seen.
Cowpox virus, a cousin of variola virus, causes a mild smallpox-like disease in cows.
There is no specific treatment for pseudo cowpox, and diseases cure itself only unless secondary bacterial infection does not occurs.
BEIRUT: The Agriculture Ministry announced Friday that it is following up on a suspected outbreak of cowpox that was found in bovine in north Lebanon's Akkar.
Eradication was made possible by the ability of vaccinia virus to induce cross-protective immunity against other viruses within the orthopoxvirus genus capable of producing human infection (e.g., variola, monkeypox, and cowpox) (3).
Cowpox to beat smallpox The idea of using one disease to fight another is not new.
The first vaccination (in 1798) for small pox (using vaccine derived from cowpox) laid the foundation for this accomplishment.
When Edward Jenner first published his finding in 1798 that the immunization of individuals with cowpox virus would produce mild disease and render full protection from smallpox, rumors emerged that people would develop horns like cows from the inoculation.
Edward Jenner reported that cowpox, a milder version, was just as effective in achieving immunity, inoculation -- which was steadily improved over the years -- became standard procedure and eventually led to the elimination of the dread disease.