Cowboy

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A derogatory term used as either an adjective or a noun
adjective Referring to a doctor who performs surgery, but isn’t fully qualified and is thus known as a 'cowboy surgeon'
noun A doctor who performs a type of surgery—e.g., a hair transplant—with little experience for the procedure
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cowgirls like Straus Family Creamery butter from nearby Tomales Bay, but any butter is fine.
(22) In Australia, from the 1890s, popular entertainments such as Wirth's Wild West Show and Wild Australia's cowgirl sharpshooters led to a demand for Western clothing.
She added, "We love cowgirls everywhere--especially those who appreciate excellent ingredients and our original approach to skin health and natural beauty."
Aside from a gender change, the name stuck and Moscow, Idaho-based Cowgirl Chocolates was born.
Inside the building, three gallery areas feature artifacts of the permanent collection, a multi-purpose theater, hands-on children's areas, a flexible gallery area for traveling exhibitions, a research library, catering kitchen, retail store and a grand rotunda focusing on the spirit of the cowgirl.
The beauty of the cowgirl look is that it is versatile - and you can take it as far as you want to.
With helmets, vests, knee pads and back braces, I could have protected myself like a knight in shining armor instead of the cowgirl I imagined myself to be.
In the cowgirl display, Burgess links how the public viewed Aboriginal women as masculine, wild and savage with the cowgirls who rode on bareback and looked and dressed like men.
The gathering was our "garden club" meeting with Rhinestone Cowgirl Phyllis McDaniel winning the prize for the prettiest outfit.
Cowgirl then follows Gemma as she grows up on an embattled housing estate in South Wales.
But the event sparked the idea for the start of his novel, Cowgirl - which has been shortlisted in the Best Fiction category for five to 12 year-olds in the Waterstones Children's Book Prize "I was scared stiff," he said.
Communities come together, bullies are beaten, racism is routed, broken families are mended, multiculturalism is espoused and the authorities are courted but most importantly, Gemma grows in confidence and in maturity, to the extent that she is both friend and equal of the initially despised Kate the cowgirl. Both girls are free to develop into the big world of adulthood unhampered by childish prejudice and fear.