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A trial comparing MACE in patients receiving iodixanol or ioxaglate during PTCA for acute coronary syndromes
Primary endpoints In-hospital MACE
Conclusion MACE is lower in high-risk patients without renal insufficiency undergoing PTCA with iodixanol than with ioxaglate

court

the persons assembled under the authority of the law to administer justice. This includes the presiding magistrate or judge, the jury if any, the counsel and advisors and witnesses for both parties.

court hierarchy
the ascending levels of the courts providing a series of higher tribunals to which appeals from lower courts can be taken. The more serious and complicated the case, the higher up in the court hierarchy it goes for primary hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our picture of Castiglione has been drawn from the refined, idealized society he imagined in the Courtier, but in Alcon, his poetry collection, he anchors himself solidly in real life.
The prison's disciplinary records reportedly detail times Courtier admitted to being part of the gang.
Courtier said, "Talent is the single most important ingre- dient to the future success of MEC.
In part one, Cervantes defends the warrior-knight over the courtier-knight and, therefore, the soldier over the courtier and the "letrado," considering the former as a representative of a morally superior class.
The head of the Djehuty Project concludes: "Unlike what the rest of courtiers of his time did, around 1470 BC, Djehuty did not place his tomb in the surrounding area of Deir el-Bahari, where the Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut was erected, but he chose the hill of Dra Abu el-Naga for his eternal rest, half kilometer further to the north, because that's where the members of the 17th Dynasty were buried".
The courtier said Prince Edward had been heard to jokingly say: "Lingerie on this floor" while using it.
Readers are immediately drawn into this world where true love even between husband and wife is an unforgivable crime where a courtiers leisure time is spent crafting ways to advance her husbands position and where the quest for "beauty" can result in painful and disfiguring lead poisoning.
Olga Pugliese, professor of Italian at the University of Toronto and director of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria College, can now be said to have furnished the summa of this trend in her new book on the making of the Courtier.
Being a courtier, and Obama is one of the best, requires agility and eloquence.
Surprisingly, the Courtier does not totally ignore the most basic instrument of university instruction, the scholastic debate.
But the categorical distinction in Kunzle's title, "Criminal to Courtier," itself does violence to the complex and shifting (see Rubens, chap.