fortitude

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fortitude

 [for´tĭ-to̳d]
in bioethics, a virtue consisting of a firm, sustained, moral courage or patient endurance of misfortune, pain, or other difficulties. As in all the virtues, the emphasis is on sustainability, not on individual acts.
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One problem with studying any type of courage is that there is no consensus definition.
However, let us get back to the matter of courage in political disagreement.
The villain did not show courage by sneaking into people's homes - and the judge's praise was an insult to one of the victims, ex-soldier Mark Clayton.
That theme was sweet in the setting of the Hanover, a building that's evolved from burlesque to cinema to its current warm glory - the product of courage.
In On Courage, Geoffrey Scarre sets out to recognize and appreciate the various manifestations of courage, resisting univocal and over-intellectualized accounts of the virtue while at the same time attempting to understand the distinctive value of courage, and why it remains a necessary, core virtue for all people.
he was a patient at Courage Center's Transitional Rehabilitation Program (TRP), known then as Courage Residence.
Furthermore, there is little doubt that because as a society we've become much softer, flabbier and significantly more docile, our admiration for sporting courage, the one strand of boldness to which we're most likely exposed, has grown.
Identifying lack of moral courage (as well as moral motivation) as a key factor in contributing to this gap between knowing and doing, Comer (management, Hofstra U.) and Vega (management, Salem State U.) present 15 papers with the intention of equipping "decent people" "with the knowledge and skills to act with moral courage" in the workplace.
She summoned up the courage to speak of her loss and her unconditional love for the dad she will never see again.
Courage. Health care organizations are not cowardly ...
The author of this book has compiled a welter of vignettes, often taken from Civil War letters he has personally collected, to explore wartime courage. Defining courage in terms akin to Aristotle, self-control while facing danger to one's life and doing what is right despite popular clamor, Wiley Sword offers ample evidence that the soldiers and officers of the Civil War displayed abundant physical bravery in battle.
But it has overcome these to bring the curtain up on its latest production Mother Courage and her Children by Bertolt Brecht at Birmingham's Old Rep Theatre next month.