fortitude

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fortitude

 [for´tĭ-to̳d]
in bioethics, a virtue consisting of a firm, sustained, moral courage or patient endurance of misfortune, pain, or other difficulties. As in all the virtues, the emphasis is on sustainability, not on individual acts.
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References in classic literature ?
Why, yes, said I, you may, and if you add the words `of a citizen,' you will not be far wrong;--hereafter, if you like, we will carry the examination further, but at present we are we w seeking not for courage but justice; and for the purpose of our enquiry we have said enough.
Why, because temperance is unlike courage and wisdom, each of which resides in a part only, the one making the State wise and the other valiant; not so temperance, which extends to the whole, and runs through all the notes of the scale, and produces a harmony of the weaker and the stronger and the middle class, whether you suppose them to be stronger or weaker in wisdom or power or numbers or wealth, or anything else.
Because I think that this is the only virtue which remains in the State when the other virtues of temperance and courage and wisdom are abstracted; and, that this is the ultimate cause and condition of the existence of all of them, and while remaining in them is also their preservative; and we were saying that if the three were discovered by us, justice would be the fourth or remaining one.
Then the power of each individual in the State to do his own work appears to compete with the other political virtues, wisdom, temperance, courage.
All of these refer to the courage that comes from faith.
If you are clear on what "right" is, it's time to measure your moral courage.
It takes courage to care for our patients when they are vulnerable, needing our compassion and expertise; courage to make life and death decisions; courage to handle the multiple changing demands of our profession; courage to manage our work and personal lives; and courage to be the leaders our patients expect and deserve.
We have had more requests than ever this year for Beads from a Distance, which we provide at no cost to families," said Jean Baruch, PhD, RN, executive director of Beads of Courage.
Most of the time when lawyers talk about courage, they mean the obvious courage of Atticus Finch: defiant, highly visible and risky.
The most important thing I learned about courage came from my colleague Scott Hartl.
Same-sex love is increasingly seen as part of human diversity, but ugly incidents continue to remind us that courage is still needed to love freely.
Ethics scholars have renewed our interest to explore theoretical measures in the construct of courage (Sekerka, Bagozzi, and Charmigo, 2009).