counterpulsation

counterpulsation

 [kown″ter-pul-sa´shun]
a technique for assisting the circulation and decreasing the work of the heart by synchronizing the force of an external pumping device with cardiac systole and diastole. External counterpulsation is a noninvasive procedure in which the legs are encased in rigid tubular bags filled with air or water and connected to a pumping unit. Internal counterpulsation requires insertion of an intra-aortic balloon-tipped catheter, the distal end of which is attached to a pump that inflates the balloon. (See also intra-aortic balloon pump.)

External counterpulsation is less effective than internal counterpulsation, but it is easier to use and less hazardous to the patient. It employs the same general principles as internal counterpulsation by applying pressure against the blood vessels of the legs during diastole and release of pressure during systole. This has the effect of increasing venous return and enhancing systolic unloading of the left ventricle. The end result of external counterpulsation is that of augmenting coronary circulation and improving blood flow to the myocardium, improving systemic circulation, and reducing the workload of the heart, thereby lessening myocardial demand for and consumption of oxygen. Indications for external counterpulsation include cardiogenic shock and severe heart failure in acute situations such as myocardial infarction and open-heart surgery. It is a temporary measure that does not benefit patients with chronic heart failure.

count·er·pul·sa·tion

(kown'ter-pŭl-sā'shŭn),
A means of assisting the failing heart by automatically removing arterial blood just before and during ventricular ejection and returning it to the circulation during diastole; a balloon catheter is inserted into the aorta and activated by an automatic mechanism triggered by the ECG.

count·er·pul·sa·tion

(kown'tĕr-pŭl-sā'shŭn)
A means of assisting the failing heart by automatically removing arterial blood just before and during ventricular ejection and returning it to the circulation during diastole; a balloon catheter is inserted into the aorta and activated by an automatic mechanism triggered by the electrocardiogram.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Prospective Evaluation of Enhanced External Counter-pulsation in Congestive Heart Failure (PEECH) trial demonstrated that enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) therapy increased exercise duration and improved functional status and quality of life without affecting peak oxygen consumption.
OBJECTIVES: The PEECH (Prospective Evaluation of Enhanced External Counter-pulsation in Congestive Heart Failure) study assessed the benefits of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) in the treatment of patients with mild-to-moderate heart failure (HF).
PURPOSE: To evaluate whether enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) exerts an effect on myocardial perfusion.
Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) has been developed for the management of these patients with chronic, refractory disease.
This study was conducted to examine the effects of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP), a noninvasive therapy that increases endothelial shear stress, on circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers and adhesion molecules in patients with angina pectoris.
In his cardiology practice, he offers patients an enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) program, a noninvasive method that restores the flow of oxygenated blood in patients with recurrent or inoperable coronary artery disease.
Intra-aortic Balloon Counterpulsation and Infarct Size in Patients With Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Without Shock.
This new application exhibits a higher survival rate than that achieved with intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP)-assisted PCI.