counterconditioning


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count·er·con·di·tion·ing

(kown'ter-kon-di'shŭn-ing),
Any of a group of specific behavior therapy techniques in which a second conditioned response (for example, approaching or even touching a snake) is introduced for the express purpose of counteracting or nullifying a previously conditioned or learned response (fear and avoidance of snakes).

counterconditioning

(koun′tər-kən-dĭsh′ə-nĭng)
n. Psychology
Conditioning intended to replace a negative response to a stimulus with a positive response.

counterconditioning

a process used in behavioral therapy in which a learned response is replaced by an alternative response that is less disruptive.

count·er·con·di·tion·ing

(kown'tĕr-kon-dish'ŭn-ing)
Any behavior therapy in which a second conditioned response (e.g., approaching or even touching a snake) is introduced for the purpose of counteracting or nullifying a previously conditioned or learned response (e.g., fear and avoidance of snakes).

counterconditioning

a technique of changing an undesirable response of an animal to a stimulus by engaging the animal in another response that is incompatible with the first.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order of decreasing value, the greatest change scores were found for counterconditioning (CC), helping relationships (HR), social liberation (SO), and contingency management (CM).
Self-liberation and self-reevaluation had the highest means throughout the program and counterconditioning, helping relationships, and social liberation had the greatest change from baseline to exit.
Process studies in language conditioning I: counterconditioning of anxiety by "calm" words.
This procedure, which resembles counterconditioning, does, however, affect a nonolfactory analogue (color-taste), suggesting that it is not a consequence of lack of experimental sensitivity (Stevenson, Boakes, & Wilson, 2000b).
Counterconditioning may be inappropriate because there is no clear US or CS.
Emotional modification and the process of change: Semantic counterconditioning.
Language-based behavior therapies, such as semantic counterconditioning and the systematic use of emotionally relevant and behavior-directive self-statements (cf.