counterconditioning


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count·er·con·di·tion·ing

(kown'ter-kon-di'shŭn-ing),
Any of a group of specific behavior therapy techniques in which a second conditioned response (for example, approaching or even touching a snake) is introduced for the express purpose of counteracting or nullifying a previously conditioned or learned response (fear and avoidance of snakes).

counterconditioning

(koun′tər-kən-dĭsh′ə-nĭng)
n. Psychology
Conditioning intended to replace a negative response to a stimulus with a positive response.

count·er·con·di·tion·ing

(kown'tĕr-kon-dish'ŭn-ing)
Any behavior therapy in which a second conditioned response (e.g., approaching or even touching a snake) is introduced for the purpose of counteracting or nullifying a previously conditioned or learned response (e.g., fear and avoidance of snakes).
References in periodicals archive ?
Counterconditioning in the treatment of spider phobia: effects on disgust, fear and valence.
Outcome-specific transfer between predictive and instrumental learning is unaffected by extinction but reversed by counterconditioning in human participants.
When you want to stop the counterconditioning, put Izzy away so you and your guests can relax, and so she won't have the opportunity to practice her inappropriate behavior.
Witkiewitz and colleagues argued that mindfulness meditation disrupts this cycle by ushering in curative mechanisms in the form of nonjudgmental, nonreactive awareness and acceptance of the craving response, thus acting as a form of counterconditioning that can serve as an alternative to addiction.
(b) Training (step up, step down, clicker training, etc)/behavior modification (habituation, desensitization, counterconditioning, etc).
--Fear-induced aggression: Identify eliciting stimuli and initiate counterconditioning.
Process studies in language conditioning--I: Counterconditioning of anxiety by "calm" words.
Counterconditioning Teaching a behavior that is incompatible with the undesirable behavior.
Behavioral habituation, counterconditioning, and a general theory of persistence.
It is necessary to identify how these behaviors were learned (Module 4) as well as how these behaviors continue to be maintained if effective counterconditioning techniques are to be implemented.
Prochaska lists these as: Consciousness Raising, Self-Reevaluation, Self-Liberation, Counterconditioning, Stimulus Control, Reinforcement Management, Helping Relationships, Dramatic Relief, Environmental Reevaluation, and Social Liberation.