force

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force

 [fors]
energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion or other activity.
Forces resulting from a fall are transmitted up to the spine through the long leg bones and pelvis. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
electromotive force the force that, by reason of differences in potential, causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current.
reserve force energy above that required for normal functioning. In the heart it is the power that will take care of the additional circulatory burden imposed by bodily exertion.
shearing f's see shear.
van der Waals f's the relatively weak, short-range forces of attraction existing between atoms and molecules, which results in the attraction of nonpolar organic compounds to each other (hydrophobic bonding).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

force (F),

(fōrs),
The external factor that causes a change in the state of rest, motion, or direction (or both), or shape of a fixed body.
[L. fortis, strong]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Biomechanics A quantifiable directional energy source
Physics A vector quantity—i.e., has both magnitude and direction—measured in newtons—N; the force of gravity acting on a 1 kg mass is 9.81 N; F=ma
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

force

(F) (fōrs)
1. That which tends to produce motion in a body.
2. Application of energy to initiate motion.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

force

(fōrs)
The external factor that causes a change in the state of rest, motion, or direction (or both), or shape of a fixed body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about force

Q. How to get a bipolar person to get treatment, if refuses to carry this condition? My girlfriend’s mom told me once by phone that my girlfriend was bipolar. I started doing a little research and learned it is difficult to live with this sickness. I don't want to brake up but my safety is fading out now

A. Unless you know for definite that your gf has actually been properly diagnosed for this disorder, you can't tell her to get treatment for a disorder that her mum thinks she may supposedly have. I think you need to have a big long chat with your girlfriend about this and show her your encouragement and support, rather than fear about your safety. She needs someone like you to understand what it is like, and it seems that her bipolar is not an extreme case, otherwise you would have known right away with her behavior. It's caused my having major highs and lows, and if she has been properly diagnosed, encourage her to get the treatment as you care for her and want her to get better!

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