can

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Related to couldst: hadst, mayest, wouldst

can

Drug slang
A regional term for 1 ounce of marijuana.

CAN

Abbreviation for:
cardiac autonomic neuropathy
central amygdaloid nucleus
central autonomic network
central autonomic nucleus
child abuse and neglect
chronic allograft nephropathy
Claim Account Number
Community Action Network (Medspeak-UK)
contrast-associated nephropathy
cord around neck
coronary artery narrowing
cortical amygdaloid nucleus
Cure Autism Now
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first two stanzas hint at a crisis that is not made explicit: My love, this is the bitterest, that thou-- Who art all truth, and who dost love me now As thine eyes say, as thy voice breaks to say-- Shouldst love so truly, and couldst love me still A whole long life through, had but love its will, Would death that leads me from thee brook delay.
what moved thee, or how couldst thou take such journeys into the fanatic Arabia?" One might ask a similar question of any traveler, but it makes a dazzling opening for Doughty, we see in retrospect, because he answers not with a brief reply but rather with two volumes of stories about what he saw in Arabia Deserta.
If thou didst see those great persons that are now dead upon the water thou couldst never forget it.
"Thou hast wasted thine efforts in unbecoming begging, when thou couldst have better served the Lord God and thyself by using thy golden bowl in study, hard thinking, meditation, and service.
This might be a psychological touch, Lysimachus' shame-faced attempt to excuse his behaviour to Marina, as it was played at Stratford-upon-Avon in 1979; but other aspects of the scene suggest that the Quarto's account is not only contradictory but also incomplete; for after only one short speech by Marina, Lysimachus says 'I did not thinke thou couldst haue spoke so well, here dremp't thou could'st, had I brought hither a corrupted minde, thy speeche had altered it' ([G4.sup.v]; IV.
Great Love, how dost thou triumph, and how reign, That to a Groom couldst humble her disdain!
How couldst thou drain the life blood of the child, To bid the father wipe his eyes withal, And yet be seen to bear a womans face?
As the dialogue begins on the first page of Rowlands' text, the gentleman-customer is resisting the apprentice's urging of a "new Booke new come foorth." New books are not to his "humours liking"; rather, "there are some old Bookes that I have more delight in then your new, if thou couldst helpe me to them." In particular, he requests "all Greenes Bookes in one Volume." The apprentice, experienced in handling customers who seek familiarity before novelty, answers that of Greene's titles he lacks "Conny-catching, and some halfe dozen more," quickly adding that he can procure the missing books from another dealer in town.
In the second of the two poems, he writes that "the love which my spirit hath painted/It never hath found but in thee." She is that most unlikely of creatures in a fallen, mutable world, the loving human being who will never betray: Though human, thou didst not deceive me, Though woman, thou didst not forsake, Though loved, thou forborest to grieve me, Though slander'd, thou never couldst shake; Though trusted, thou didst not disclaim me, Though parted, it was not to fly, Though watchful, 't was not to defame me, Nor, mute, that the world might belie.
There is also the virtue of Macbeth's remorse, couched in three identically constructed phrases and delivered by him directly after three critical moments in the downward trajectory of his soul: "Would they had stayed" (1.3.80), sighs Macbeth, upon the witches' vanishing into the foul air; "Wake Duncan with thy knocking: I would thou couldst." (2.2.77); and "I drink to [...] our dear friend Banquo, whom we miss.