cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in classic literature ?
Was not the witchcraft delusion partly caused by Cotton Mather?
Here Grandfather was interrupted by little Alice, who hid her face in his lap, and murmured a wish that he would not talk any more about Cotton Mather and the evil spirits.
There was great need of the prayers of Cotton Mather and of all pious men, not only on account of the sufferings of the people, but because the old moral and religious character of New England was in danger of being utterly lost.
The next event which Grandfather spoke of was one that Cotton Mather, as well as most of the other inhabitants of New England, heartily rejoiced at.
That night the town was illuminated; and Cotton Mather threw aside book and pen, and left Grandfather’s chair vacant, while he walked hither and thither to witness the rejoicings.
The Great Sahib said: 'That One which taught thy man-eaters to grow cotton for thee.
The other girls went to their rooms as agreed upon, and all was soon dark and still up stairs, while Miss Cotton began to enjoy herself below, as she always did when 'her young charges' were safely disposed of.
Now you 've done it,' cried Sally, as Mary scratched like a mad rat, and a door creaked below, for Miss Cotton was not deaf.
Poor Mary was nearly caught for Miss Cotton was quicker than Betsey, and our guard had to run for her life.
Miss Cotton stood staring about her, looking so funny, without her cap, that my bedfellow would have gone off in a fit of laughter, if I had not pinched her warningly.
Miss Cotton marched into the next room, put the same question and received the same reply.
That there were now occasional sounds of feet and voices overhead which he inferred the cotton did not exclude, from the circumstance of his evidently being clutched by the lady as a victim on whom to expend her superabundant agitation when the sounds were loudest.