cottonmouth

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moccasin

 [mok´ah-sin]
any of several species of snakes of the genus Agkistrodon.
highland moccasin copperhead.
water moccasin Agkistrodon piscivorus, a venomous semiaquatic pit viper with an olive or brown back, found in the southern United States. Called also cottonmouth.

cottonmouth

a poisonous pit viper (Agkistrodon piscivorus) commonly found near water and swamps of the southeastern part of the United States. The symptoms of the bite of a cottonmouth are rapid swelling, severe pain, skin discoloration at bite marks, and weakness. Antivenin and ventilatory/circulatory support are the usual treatments. Also called water moccasin.
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Cottonmouth

cottonmouth

(kot'on-mowth?)
A venomous snake, Agkistrodon piscivorus, common in the southern and eastern U.S.
Synonym: water moccasin See: snake bitevenomous snake
References in periodicals archive ?
All of North America's pit vipers (Copperheads, Cottonmouths, and rattlesnakes) have a broad, triangular head and narrow neck.
I observed cottonmouths within Shawnee National Forest, Union County, Illinois.
Cagle (1942) and Conway (1978) described cottonmouths as abundant at this den complex in the 1940s.
Yet he is still very much a leader with the Cottonmouths.
Oxygen consumption and the energetic of island-dwelling Florida cottonmouth snakes.
Blackbeard has a healthy population of forearm-thick diamondback rattlesnakes and cottonmouths.
In the boxes the men heard the water rise in the trench and looked out for cottonmouths.
Rattlesnakes, copperheads, and cottonmouths all have these heat-sensitive pits, so they are referred to as pit vipers.
Most readers would agree--one doesn't forget easily the "thick, raking, awkward blows" of the Eastern cottonmouth which attacks the slave in "Red Leaves" and then stands its ground, as cottonmouths do, "half sprawled with its own momentum and rage," before it lashes out again.
This is especially true for pit vipers such as cottonmouths, copperheads, and rattlesnakes.
On any given day during this annual migration--repeated in reverse between mid-March and mid-May--visitors can see venomous copperheads, timber rattlers, and cottonmouths, as well as nonvenomous king and rat snakes, yellowbellies, and green (a threatened species in Illinois), garter, earth, and ringneck snakes.