cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One small study in Andhra Pradesh reported that all six sheep that grazed on Bt cotton plants died within a month, while the three controls fed natural cotton plants showed no adverse symptoms.
These toxic compounds are useful to cotton plants as they also occur in the leaves and stems where they deter insect and microbe attack.
Cotton plants also contain suites of putatively defensive secondary compounds (Bi et al.
Cotton plant morphology may be influenced by the presence of winter cereal residues on the soil surface.
Humic acid therefore has the potential to be used as a soil amendment for cotton plants to overcome the adverse effects of soil salinity.
(2002) state that with the water stress during the growing season of the cotton plant, final productivity can be affected, since it depends on the production and control of boll weevils, and both can be affected with water stress.
To establish a biological function of GhGLP1, several independent transgenic cotton plants that over-express GhGLP1 were developed.
Yields of cotton per acre also suffered because of the lower strength of cotton plants because of disease and shortage of water in some areas, thus reducing the overall cotton output in the country.
Losses of Mepiquat Chloride from cotton plants ranged between 52 and 28% with rains occurring from immediately after to up to 32 hours after spraying (MATEUS et al., 2004).
Scientists from ARS and many universities, state agricultural experiment stations, and private companies are currently conducting more than two dozen research projects at the CWN to identify genes from exotic and wild cotton plants that may improve fiber quality, increase yields, resist pests and pathogens, and enhance drought tolerance.