cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cotton plants were ginning at 5th and 1st October at 2011 and 2012 seasons, respectively, under intercropping and solid culture (I).
Technician Neal Hudson (formerly with ARS) sweeps cotton plants in a study to determine the efficiency of the sweepnet for capturing adult Lygus hesperus.
Electrode 1 of cable 1 was positioned at the base of the head ditch, where the siphon water enters the furrow, and the cotton plants started at electrode 6 on cable 1.
In the other study, Xiao-Ya Chen and his colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai used a similar trick to increase the cotton bollworm's sensitivity to gossypol, a defense chemical produced by the cotton plant.
Gossypol is a natural toxin that is thought to protect the cotton plant from insect damage.
In most of the fields visited in the month of late October 2002, the Bt cotton plants were in a stage of maturity with leaves turning red before dropping off.
Dr Curt Brubaker, Dr Helen McFadden and their colleagues at CSIRO Plant Industry and Dr Natalie Moore's team at QDPI are searching for a solution in the gene pools of native Australian cotton plants.
One cotton variant may indeed grow to the size of a small tree, but most cotton plants are very low and shrub-like.
This policy imposes extensive and expensive regulatory requirements on field tests of gene-spliced cotton plants that have increased resistance to insects, for example, but exempts plants with virtually identical traits that were engineered by cruder, less-predictable hybridization techniques.
Preliminary results from a parallel experiment with immature cottonseeds from transformed cotton plants showed a similar inhibition in vitro of germinated conidia of A.