cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The amount of cotton squares and small bolls with punctures of feeding and/or oviposition by boll weevil and then fallen on soil in relation to the planting row showed significant relation with the plant age (F633=39.18, P<0.001), indicating that the number of reproductive structures in each soil strip increased with the phenological development of the cotton plant (Table 1).
Dry Matter and Seed Cotton Yield: At the initial flowering stage, N1 for CCRI 79 and N1 for CCRI 60 produced the greatest dry matter weight of cotton plant in 2013 and 2014, respectively, and N1 for CCRI 60 in 2013 and N3 for CCRI 79 in 2014 produced the least dry matter weight.
Cotton plant architecture with maximum plant height, more boll count, more number of sympodial and monopodial branches, early blooming, high seed cotton yield and seed index (Farzana et al., 2005) are linked with selection of genotype and early sowing (Norfleet et al., 1997; Wrather et al., 2008).
COTTON (GOSSYPIUMHIRSUTUM) is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the family of Malvaceae.
Amongst the eight plants tested in the laboratory as an alternative food for adult boll weevils, beyond cotton plant, only flowers of hibiscus and okra plants provided nutrition to this pest.
pe effect of application of micronutrients on cotton plant height (Table 1) indicates pat pere was significant (F=28.26 DF=2125 Pless than 0.05) effect of application of micronutrients on plant height.
Cotton plants (Gossypium spp.; Malvales: Mal vaceae were cultivated in greenhouses in plastic flowerpots (18 cm diam x 17 cm height).
The authors thank C Zhang, MY Wang, JP Min, and XL Guo for their helpfulness in cotton plant culture and experiment.
Then people learned to cultivate Cotton plants in the fields.
The effort will include transferring technology; providing technical assistance for research into plant varieties and seed; supplying cotton plant varieties suitable to growers in West Africa; supplying agricultural machinery, fertilizer, and seed; and financing educational programs of benefit to cotton growers.