cotinine


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co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn), Do not confuse this word with cotarnine.
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.
[anagram of nicotine]

cotinine

(kōt′n-ēn′)
n.
The major metabolite of nicotine that indicates levels of nicotine intake.

cotinine

A urinary metabolite of nicotine used to monitor exposure to environmental tobacco smoke–ETS. See Environmental tobacco smoke.

co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn)
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relation of urinary cotinine concentrations to cigarette smoking and to exposure to other people's smoke.
For detection of SP-D and cotinine in plasma, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was carried out using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent kit (Glory Science, Del Rio, TX78840, USA) in the UHS Laboratory of Physiology and Cell Biology, Lahore.
Second, serum cotinine levels reflect recent exposure; thus, exposure misclassification might have occurred.
A urine cotinine threshold value (ng/mL) below 10 was considered 'no exposure,' a value of 10-500 was considered as 'passive smoker,' and a value above 500 was considered as 'active smoker.' A urine cotinine/creatinine ratio of 30 and below was considered as 'no exposure' and a value above 30 was considered as 'passive smoker' (17, 18).
The amount of cotinine in the saliva of participants was measured using the NicAlert saliva nicotine test, purchased from Craig Medical Distribution Inc., CA, USA.
Because of the slow elimination of cotinine, several CM smoking programs have initially reinforced abstinence using daily breath CO monitoring and then transitioned to less frequent monitoring with cotinine measures (e.g., Dunn et al, 2008; 2010; Heil et al., 2008; Higgins et al., 2004; 2007; 2010).
adult ([greater than or equal to] 18 y old)], sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status (current, former, never), and cotinine level [10 ng/mL cut point; a threshold that has been associated with active smoking (Pirkle et al.
Researchers used specially designed hand wipes to extract nicotine from the hands of participating children and took saliva samples to look for corresponding levels of cotinine. All of the children had detectible nicotine levels on their hands and all but one had detectable cotinine in saliva.
The cotinine creatinine ratio (CCR) of each sample was calculated from the equation CCR = urinary cotinine (ng/ml)/urinary creatinine (ng/mg).
In all subjects, concentrations of cotinine in saliva and copper in serum were assessed to determine whether the woman was exposed (passive or active) to tobacco smoke.
In the 1980s, children had an average of 0.96nl/ml of cotinine in their saliva, while in 1998 this had reduced to 0.52nl/ml.