cotinine


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn), Do not confuse this word with cotarnine.
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.
[anagram of nicotine]

cotinine

(kōt′n-ēn′)
n.
The major metabolite of nicotine that indicates levels of nicotine intake.

cotinine

A urinary metabolite of nicotine used to monitor exposure to environmental tobacco smoke–ETS. See Environmental tobacco smoke.

co·ti·nine

(kō'ti-nēn)
One of the major detoxication products of nicotine; eliminated rapidly and completely by the kidneys.

cotinine (kō´tinēn),

n a substance that remains in body fluids after nicotine has been used. Presence of this chemical in body fluids is considered proof of recent nicotine use. It is currently being studied for its possible contribution to a range of oral diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) to reinforce short-term abstinence using cotinine measures was to make payment contingent upon specified reductions in cotinine levels.
All of the children had detectible nicotine levels on their hands and all but one had detectable cotinine in saliva.
We used two existing data sets with Illumina[R]450K methylation measured in newborns and cotinine measured in maternal plasma during pregnancy to develop and test a methylation score to predict smoking.
11nl/ml, with more than two-thirds registering no cotinine at all.
Another benefit is the cost savings that can be realized with the PTS Detect cotinine system.
Serum cotinine concentration and wound complication in head and neck reconstruction.
37-40) Physiological metabolism of nicotine after exposure yields cotinine (nicotine's metabolite) in saliva, urine and serum.
The first study, of 523 children 4 to 16 years of age with physician-diagnosed asthma, correlated smoke exposure, as indicated by serum cotinine levels, with pulmonary function tests and clinical outcomes.
Reality: This is impossible because of the enormous differences in cotinine levels in tobacco users versus nonusers condemned to share enclosed spaces with them.
The rate of hearing loss appeared to be cumulative, increasing with the level of cotinine detected by blood tests.
They defined exposure as having at least one smoker in the house and by serum cotinine levels of 0.
Their hearing was tested and blood was analysed for traces of cotinine, a chemical the body produces from nicotine.