clothing

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clothing

[AS. clath, cloth]
Wearing apparel; used both functionally and decoratively. From the medical standpoint, clothes conserve heat or protect the body (e.g., gloves, sunhelmets, and shoes). Air spaces in a fabric and its texture, rather than the material alone, conserve heat. In matted woolen fabrics, the air spaces are destroyed and insulation is lost. Wool and silk absorb more moisture than other fabrics, but silk loses it more readily. Cotton and linen come next, but linen loses moisture more quickly than cotton. Knitted fabrics absorb and dry more readily than woven fabrics of the same material. The temperature inside an individual's hat may vary from 13° to 20°F (7° to 11°C) warmer than the outside temperature.

adapted clothing

Garments designed with special features, such as Velcro closures, to enable persons with disabilities to dress themselves without assistance.
See: clo; hypothermia
References in classic literature ?
The harlequin had reassumed her peasant's costume, and as she passed she raised her mask.
When you arrive at the first step of the church of San Giacomo, be sure to fasten a knot of rose-colored ribbons to the shoulder of your harlequin costume, in order that you may be recognized.
He remembered some of the costumes he had seen in Paris, and he adapted one of them, getting his effect from a combination of violent, unusual colours.
You are liable to occasionally splash a little when sculling, and it appeared that a drop of water ruined those costumes. The mark never came out, and a stain was left on the dress for ever.
You don't mean to say you want Rose to come out in this costume? It's not proper, and I won't consent to it!"
Snodgrass engage to array themselves in costumes which his taste and experience induced him to recommend as admirably suited to the occasion.
Winkworth on the admirable taste and beauty of her costume.
They were divided into four companies, and Tip noticed that all were dressed in costumes similar to that worn by General Jinjur.
The party went to the theater, where they saw a play acted by foxes dressed in costumes of brilliantly colored feathers.
The two thieves were dressed in the fanciful court costumes of the middle of the sixteenth century, while the Saviour was nude, with the exception of a cloth around the loins.
In an hour, all the costumes were crumpled and disordered.
The streets were full of them, and their costumes were so splendid that the rich dress of the Keeper of the Wicket was commonplace when compared with the others.