costophrenic


Also found in: Acronyms.

costophrenic (CP),

Involving or denoting the ribs and diaphragm.

costophrenic

(kŏs″tō-frĕn′ĭk) [″ + Gr. phren, diaphragm]
Pert. to the ribs and diaphragm.

costophrenic

pertaining to the ribs and diaphragm.

costophrenic angle
in radiographs, the angle between the ribs and the diaphragm. Details may be blurred by the presence of fluid in the pleural cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional signs include the "deep sulcus" sign, a deepening and widening of the costophrenic sulcus due to intrapleural gas tracking inferolaterally, (11) and the "double diaphragm" sign (Figure 9), the presence of two diaphragm-gas interfaces, classically at the dome and anterior costophrenic sulcus.
Chiropractors should look for an asymmetry of the hemi diaphragm, or a blunting of the costophrenic angle on every film where the diaphragm can be visualised.
Costophrenic sinuses were bilaterally blunted and the density of the lesions were decreased.
1998a) Computerized delineation and analysis of costophrenic angles in digital chest radiographs, Academic Radiol.
The EKG again showed abnormalities, including a nonspecific T-wave abnormality, as did the chest radiograph (moderate cardiomegaly, tortuous aorta, mild prominence of the pulmonary vasculature without evidence of congestive failure, and small left pleural effusion or slight blunting of the left lateral costophrenic angle).
A chest radiograph demonstrated bilateral alveolar and interstitial opacities, blunting of the costophrenic angles bilaterally, and bilateral pleural effusions.
The dependent viscera sign is seen with diaphragmatic rupture when there is loss of the posterior support of the diaphragm, allowing the viscera to drop against the posterior ribs and obliterating the posterior costophrenic recess.
These angles are named after their location: hence the term costophrenic angles.
Chest x-ray revealed subcutaneous emphysema over the lower neck region, atelectasis of the right lower lung field, and bilateral blunting of the costophrenic angle (Fig.
With the patient cleaned and draped, a puncture site is fluoroscopically selected below the costophrenic angle in the mid-axillary line.
A subject was classified as having a pleural abnormality if two out of three B-readers indicated a) any unilateral or bilateral pleural calcification on the diaphragm, chest wall, or other site or b) any unilateral or bilateral pleural thickening or plaque on the chest wall, diaphragm, or costophrenic angle site, consistent with asbestos-related pleural disease, using the P-A view, the oblique views, or a combination of those views.
Chest radiograph showed bilateral nonhomogenous opacity predominantly in mid and lower zones that were clearly depicted as reticular and nodular shadows with some cystic shadows in upper zones in the scanogram and homogeneous opacification of the right costophrenic angle suggestive of pleural effusion [Figure 1].