cost-effectiveness ratio

cost-effectiveness ratio

The ratio of the costs of a healthcare intervention (compared to the alternative—e.g., non-intervention or best alternative treatment) to the change in effects of the intervention—e.g., avoiding a relapse in a cancer patient, heart attack in a hypertensive patient.
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The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for PCI, compared with OMT at 3 years was attractive at $1,600 per quality-adjusted life-year gained.
The drug was found to be within the threshold of what is considered a cost-effective use of NHS resources as the cost-effectiveness ratio for the treatment followed by best supportive care, in comparison to supportive care alone, was [pounds sterling]23,115 per QALY gained.
The optimal package's incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is $1454/QALY (quality-adjusted life year) over 5 years and $2380/QALY over 30 years.
Despite the sensitivity of cost-effectiveness ratio, the range across which ICER varied didn't alter any of the results.
EVEN IF THE PRICE of tenofovir, which is anticipated to become generic next year, cuts the cost of HIV preexposure prophylaxis by 65%, and even if this in turn drops the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of preexposure prophylaxis among drug injectors to $100,000 or less per QALY, the overall price for this kind of program would still be $17 billion over a 20-year period.
In addition, Entresto increased life expectancy at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio consistent with other high-value widely accepted cardiovascular interventions such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cholesterol-lowering statins before they became generic.
Data were analyzed by comparing both strategies in the base case, by reporting crude costs, clinical outcomes, and efficiency indicators such as: Cost-Effectiveness Rate (CER) and Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER).
At a reduced price of US$ 7 and US$ 13 per dose, vaccination would have an even more favorable cost-effectiveness ratio for the three countries analyzed.
Under that scenario, at a genetic testing cost of $2,580, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is $50,000 per additional quality-adjusted life year, which meets the definition of cost-effectiveness widely accepted by health policy makers.
The cost-effectiveness ratio for supplemental ultrasonography was $325,000 per QALY gained (range, $112,000-$766,000).
7) Considering that there is growing use of opioids for the relief of moderate to severe pain, (8) there is a need to determine the cost-effectiveness ratio of the different drug combinations available for the management of acute pain in Colombia.
Economic data demonstrated that the use of the genomic assay is cost effective as part of a standardised method for metastatic cancer diagnosis, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of USD 50,273 (EUR 36,914)/quality-adjusted life year, which compares favourably to the society's willingness-to-pay threshold in oncology of at least USD 100,000/quality-adjusted life year.