cost-effectiveness


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cost-effectiveness

the extent to which an activity is thought to be as valuable as it is expensive. A public-assistance program that issued vouchers for nutritious foods in pregnancy might be considered cost-effective if it lowered the costly incidence of perinatal morbidity.

cost-ef·fec·tive·ness

(kawst-e-fekt'iv-nĕs)
The proportion between expense and the goods and services received for them.

cost-effectiveness

An assessment or determination of the most efficient and least expensive approaches to providing health care and preventive medicine services. One component, health education, focuses on helping people to assume some responsibility for their own health maintenance and avoid preventable illness and disability. Accident prevention programs, immunization drives, and safe-sex campaigns are designed to reduce the number of patients who will suffer preventable illnesses. To control costs, health care providers and health care customers must also understand the comparative value of procedures and medicines. See: preventive medicine; preventive nursing
cost-effective, adjective

cost-effectiveness

pertaining to cost-effective.

cost-effectiveness analysis
a comparison of the relative cost-efficiencies of two or more ways of performing a task or achieving an objective.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the "success" of using cost-effectiveness data in decision-making as commented by Williams and Bryan (3) and also being "a wonderful exception to this rule" as commented by Erntoft, (4) it was well-observed that cost-effectiveness data was lacking as decision support in the majority of cases.
The investigators assessed the cost-effectiveness of each of the vaccines and of no vaccination using a mathematical simulation model that estimated the effects on influenza-related health outcomes in a hypothetical cohort of healthy children aged 6 months to 4 years.
the cost-effectiveness ratio for routine HIV screening every 5 years among high-risk patients (3.
However, the overall cost-effectiveness is difficult to gauge, Hornberger says.
The FDA already has some experience in evaluating cost-effectiveness claims.
I think the professional and scientific community is recognizing and validating that a pharmacy benefits management organization can conduct rigorous and relevant research on the cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical therapies," maintains Motheral.
Jacobs RJ and Meyerhoff AS, Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A/B vaccine versus hepatitis B vaccine in public sexually transmitted disease clinics, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2003, 30(11):859-865.
In particular, cost-effectiveness analysis is the proper decision procedure for evaluating regulations that have fixed benefit levels.
Rather, they propose that it be combined with cost-effectiveness analyses so that agency administrators can compare policy options and approve those that give the most bang for the buck in terms of health protections.
Little or no cost-effectiveness appraisal is done due largely to lack of data,'' said Connie Hall Colter with Quantec, hired by the city to do the evaluation.
Based on previous studies, an expected compliance rate of 60% was used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of screening tests.
A decision model[18] was developed to determine the cost-effectiveness of using immunohistochemistry compared with not using immunohistochemistry in different clinical scenarios.