cost-benefit analysis


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Related to cost-benefit analysis: Cost-effectiveness analysis

cost-benefit analysis

Cost-benefit evaluation Clinical trials A form of economic analysis from a social perspective, in which the costs of medical care are compared with the economic benefits of the care provided, with both the costs and benefits being expressed in monetary units; the benefits evaluated include projected ↓ in future health care costs and ↑ earning as a result of the intervention of interest. Cf Cost-effectiveness analysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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To his credit, he deals head-on with some of the major pitfalls in cost-benefit analysis. He devotes a whole chapter, for example, to Friedrich Hayek's "knowledge problem," concerning the difficulty governments have in gathering and employing important information that exists in decentralized form in millions of minds.
As to the Cost-benefit analysis model, cost of EV is composed of two categories of cost - implementation cost which is involved with initial investment and operation cost which depends on usage of resources and equipment.
Political economists need to continue challenging the theoretical premises behind the use of cost-benefit analysis. But the flawed empirical basis for this operationalized version of neoclassical economics should also be challenged.
Cost-benefit analysis tends to yield highly technical reports that must be interpreted for policy leaders who rarely have time to digest detailed findings.
Cost-benefit analysis is a technique developed by economists in the middle of the twentieth century for measuring the economic benefits and harms of a given law, policy, regulation, or project.
(4.) Coates, Towards Better Cost-Benefit Analysis, supra note 1, at 2-5; Cox, supra note 2, at 31 ("[A] close assessment of the costs and benefits matter a good deal in the sound formulation of policy.").
On the first question, industry groups--principally trade associations representing polluters--favored the use of cost-benefit analysis, arguing that environmental benefits needed to be weighed against the resulting undesirable economic consequences.
Researchers evaluated states' use of cost-benefit analysis on the number of cost-benefit studies released per year during the 2008-2011 study period, whether these studies had assessed multiple program options to compare policy solutions and whether and the extent to which study findings had influenced budget and policy decisions.
The cost-benefit analysis was based on a representative patient with chronic pain receiving prescribed opioid medication and two to six urine tests over one year.
John Cridland, director-general of the CBI, said, 'The ICB should not proceed with the idea unless it stands up to a rigorous cost-benefit analysis.'
The researchers say their proposed method takes into account important variables that the average cost-benefit analysis does not, such as pain, suffering, and worry, as well as food-borne illness that does not do any economic damage to an individual--for instance, a case of food poisoning on a Friday night that resolves before the workweek begins.
An early education program for children from low-income families is estimated to generate $4 to $11 of economic benefits over a child*'s lifetime for every dollar spent initially on the program, according to a cost-benefit analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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