cosmopolite

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cosmopolite

(kŏz-mŏp′ə-līt′)
n.
1. A cosmopolitan person: a true cosmopolite—a Renaissance man.
2. Ecology An organism found in most parts of the world.

cos·mop′o·lit′ism (-lī-tĭz′əm, -lĭ-tĭz′-) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the theory of concentric circles of identities we can display that cosmopolitism is being formed and maintained in these exact ways.
The streak of ethnic radicalism present in Kallen's attempt to redefine American cultural symbolism within the "music" of cosmopolitism, was not borrowed by Bourne's refusal of the melting-pot idea, and appraisal of a 'new' nationally diverse America.
He reminds us that when Rulfo wrote the novel, there was a disagreement as to whether it was part of regionalism (and thus a novel of the Revolution) or if it represented cosmopolitism.
The perfecting of the extension of social communications introduces little by little a wise cosmopolitism habituating one to consider all of the nations as families in the universal society, without, however, losing the special love of one's own.
Sturma analyzes the transition from Early to Late Romanticism and the concomitant "ideological" change from the fervent embrace of the ideals of the French revolution and Kant's cosmopolitism by the early romantics to the conservatism, some would say the reactionary outlook, of many representatives of Late Romanticism, in particular Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel, Friedrich Gentz, and Joseph Gorres.
In spite of the cultural relativism and the cosmopolitism of disciplinary traditions, anthropological paradigms still refer to ethnocentric national orientations.
From reception areas to enclavic pluralism and cosmopolitism, we will comment on the increasing complexity of immigration installation processes and the need for researchers to constantly refer to several conceptual models of insertion/integration to comprehend this phenomenon.
Coincidentally, after investigating Georgian literary thinking, Irma Ratiani argues that writers are engaged in the dialogue between nation and the world, cosmopolitism and patriotism when they experience personal or national trauma (Ratiani 510-512).
However, the contexts are steadily changing as social developments like formal education, out-of-home work situations and urbanization with its attendant cosmopolitism has seen the oral narrative evolve in both structure and performance.
These groups also contribute to the development of urbanity and cosmopolitism which provide an ideal background for Allende's narration of independent women protagonists.
Shanghai of "golden age" is a mix of colonialism, cosmopolitism and modernity, social climbing and sexuality, seeking for modern Chinese identity and formation of patriotic feelings.