cosmopolitan

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cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tan),
In the biologic sciences, a term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]

cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tăn)
biologic sciences A term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
References in periodicals archive ?
Another is that cosmopolitan theorists tend to believe that
It should force a great many "liberal" intellectuals to take their glib antiliberalism seriously - to examine all the conclusions that proceed from their trendy attacks on dynamism and cosmopolitan values.
But that is precisely why Kant believes that rational cosmopolitans can actually exist.
A diverse media landscape risks being treated as a means to universal cosmopolitan cultivation.
The post We are all Cosmopolitans appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Finally, cosmopolitans recognize obligations beyond "kith and kin" and realize that, as Immanuel Kant stated, "violation of rights in one place is felt throughout the world.
This article seeks to contextualize the concept of cosmopolitan democracy.
A comprehensive history that begins with the Gold Rush, Cosmopolitans illuminates the events and personalities that shaped the Bay Area's Jewish and civic communities in chronological and thematic chapters.
For many of the cosmopolitans, para-church organizations satisfy their needs for fellowship and spiritual support.
I've had many Cosmopolitans sent across to me in bars, but I always think, God, if I could get this in a bottle, I could clean so much stuff at home.
Those old-school, hard-core cosmopolitans demanded a lot from our sympathetic imaginations in getting us to feel the pain of distant others and from our wallets in suggesting that our moral and political duties required very substantial financial commitments to alleviate that distant pain.
Defending a cosmopolitan approach to global political theory against its three main rivals--realism, nationalism, and the society-of-states tradition--Simon Caney discusses six topics, each in a separate chapter, on which these approaches diverge: the existence of universal moral values, civil and political human rights, universal principles of distributive justice, the design of the global institutional order, just war theory, and humanitarian intervention.