cosmopolitan

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cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tan),
In the biologic sciences, a term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tăn)
biologic sciences A term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Following these observations about the alien, my analysis of cosmopolitanism in The Day pays particular attention to the central relationship between cosmopolitanism and processes of personal and social transformation.
In the last three decades, Beros notes, the topic of cosmopolitanism has had a revival, not only in the field of philosophy but also in anthropology, sociology, politics and cultural studies, especially with the evolution of globalization.
Like terrorism, cosmopolitanism is a contested concept.
Peters, leading educational philosopher, in usual probing, erudite and delicate style reconsiders cosmopolitanism and the notion of global citizenship in relation to education and human rights, in particular their juridical reconstruction as a basis for equality and a new welfare knowledge society.
Cosmopolitanism, in some rejoinders to the question "whose cosmopolitanism," is influenced by a joint force of "contingency and consistency" (Irving, "Chance" 72), and refuses "hegemonic assumptions" or stereotypical ascriptions on any social groups (Schiller, "Diasporic" 103).
Western cosmopolitanism often rests on the oppositional energies of persons simultaneously bound to local and to global loyalties.
We find inspiration in Bourdieu's notion of reconversion strategies (1984), as well as in the sociology of cosmopolitanism which has theorised cosmopolitanism as an important resource in contemporary, increasingly transnational, social life.
Following the lead of other scholars, she pursues that goal by studying "cosmopolitanism as a practice" (p.
For the remainder of the book, McDonald alternates between arguments against some common philosophical, religious, social and political impediments to actualising ecocentric cosmopolitanism and the kinds of social and political changes that would be necessary in order to bring ecocentric cosmopolitanism into being.
Nels Pearson opens Irish Cosmopolitanism with an acknowledgment of the paradox embedded in his title: how can we speak of a particular, national variety of cosmopolitanism when cosmopolitanism makes claims for the affiliation of human beings as an inclusive, transnational community?