cosmopolitan

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cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tan),
In the biologic sciences, a term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]

cos·mo·pol·i·tan

(koz'mō-pol'i-tăn)
biologic sciences A term denoting worldwide distribution.
[G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
References in periodicals archive ?
In media studies, cosmopolitanism has predominately been understood as a moral will to act upon injustices and suffering in the less privileged areas of the globe--a willingness that can potentially be triggered by various mediated appeals (Chouliaraki 2013; Joye 2009; Madianou 2013; Scott 2013).
Peters asks us to consider, among other things, the deep and entangled roots of our ideas about globalization in the Kantian ideal of universal hospitality and world citizenship, the economic cosmopolitanism of Hayek and Friedman, and its neoliberal progeny, 17th and 18th-century political economy and in relation to thinking in moral philosophy, the possibilities and limits of ethical and social education after Auschwitz, the meaning of Lyotard's turn to philosophy after his rupture with Marxism, Heidegger's anti-humanism and Derrida's proposal for a New Humanities, and the precarious position of the nation-state in an aged of postmodern terrorism.
Rather, its chapters work above all to hypothesize and catalogue shared or common manifestations of imputed cosmopolitanism in the three cities.
That Joyce plays an important role in both studies of cosmopolitanism should be no surprise.
Mandela's conceptions of cosmopolitanism and global citizenship are intimately linked to his idea that people should cultivate feelings of empathy that cut across race, religion, ethnicity and other groupings.
A discussion of the ghazals cosmopolitanism must include a brief history of the ghazal and its transmutations from the original Arabic: the earliest ghazals were romantic odes included as one of the segments of the qasida--a long, multisegmented poem written in monorhyme (with a set of predetermined themes) that sixth-century Arab Bedouins composed as their caravans traveled from oasis to oasis, reciting these poems at campsites.
This could be seen as a Latin American cosmopolitan victory, for according to Lori Cole, Latin American cosmopolitanism "represented an effort to compete with European culture on its own terms," in which Latin American subjects posed themselves as the future of Europe (122-23).
Similarly, his claims that American Jews' supposed cosmopolitanism is enabled by the "virtual disappearance" of antisemitism in the US is belied by recent FBI hate crime statistics and data collected by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League.
3) Yet none of them discusses the important place of representations of cosmopolitanism and spatial/temporal relations within these works, or effectively connects the presentation of sexuality to ideas of cosmopolitanism within the novels.
Anke Biendarra reads autobiographically inspired texts by Russian-German writers Lena Gorelik (Meine weijlen Nachte, 2004), Alina Bronsky (Scherbenpark, 2008), and Olga Grjasnowa (DerRusse ist einer, derBirken liebt, 2012) in context with the changing meanings the term transnationalism has taken on in the last 25 years, with New World Literature, and with cosmopolitanism.
While a growing awareness of common risks with the advent of globalization is arguably fostering a sense of collective future, it leads a call to mediate on cosmopolitanism afresh.
the question of anti-imperialism as an articulation of cosmopolitanism,