cortisone


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Related to cortisone: cortisol, prednisone

cortisone

 [kor´tĭ-sōn]
a glucocorticoid with significant mineralocorticoid activity, isolated from the adrenal cortex, largely inactive in humans until it is converted to hydrocortisone (cortisol). Cortisone, as the acetate ester, is used as an antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant and for replacement therapy in adrenocortical insufficiency; administered orally or by intramuscular injection.

cortisone

(kōr'ti-sōn), Avoid using this word as a synonym of adrenocortical steroid.
17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone, a biologically inactive adrenal corticosteroid produced by the reversible 11-hydroxylation of cortisol (17-hydroxycorticosterone). It was the first glucocorticoid to be used in therapy (1949). Like the endogenous substance, natural and synthetic cortisone administered as a drug exerts no effect until converted to cortisol.

cortisone

/cor·ti·sone/ (-sōn) a natural glucocorticoid that is metabolically convertible to cortisol; the acetate ester is used as an antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant and for replacement therapy in adrenocortical insufficiency.

cortisone

(kôr′tĭ-sōn′, -zōn′)
n.
A naturally occurring corticosteroid, C21H28O5, that is converted in the body to cortisol. It is used in synthetic form as a drug, especially to treat adrenal insufficiency, certain allergies, and inflammation, as from rheumatoid arthritis.

cortisone

[kôr′təsōn]
a synthetic glucocorticoid.
indication It is prescribed for adrenocortical insufficiency inflammation.
contraindications Fungal infections or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its systemic use. Viral or fungal infections of the skin, impaired circulation, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its topical use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse reactions to the systemic administration of the drug are GI, endocrine, neurological, fluid, and electrolyte disturbances, so the drug must be used with caution when there are pre-existing conditions. Skin reactions may result from topical administration. Therapy lasting longer than a few days can lead to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal suppression.

cortisone

(1) An older, “short form” for corticosterone. 
(2) Cortisone (17 alpha-,21-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3,11,20-trione).

cortisone

A glucocorticoid derived from cortisol, the term cortisone may be used generically to refer to all synthetic glucocorticoids

cor·ti·sone

(kōr'ti-sōn)
A glucocorticoid not normally secreted in significant quantities by the human cortex of the suprarenal gland. It exhibits no biologic activity until converted to hydrocortisone (cortisol); it acts on carbohydrate metabolism and influences the nutrition and growth of connective (collagenous) tissues.

cortisone

The first corticosteroid produced for treatment purposes. It is converted to hydrocortisone in the liver. It was used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, severe allergies, adrenal failure and other conditions but has been largely replaced by more powerful synthetic steroids. A brand name is Cortisyl.

cortisone

a GLUCOCORTICOID hormone secreted by the adrenal cortex, whose function is to combat stress. It causes shrinkage of lymph nodes and lowers the white blood cell count, reduces inflammation, promotes healing and stimulates GLUCONEOGENESIS. Cortisone controls its own production, which is triggered by the ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE in a negative FEEDBACK MECHANISM.

Cortisone

Glucocorticoid produced by the adrenal cortex in response to stress. Cortisone is a steroid and has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties.

cortisone

hydrocortisone; adrenal cortex glucocorticoid hormone

cor·ti·sone

(kōr'ti-sōn) Avoid using this word as a synonym of adrenocortical steroid.
Biologically inactive adrenal corticosteroid produced by the reversible 11-hydroxylation of cortisol (17-hydroxycorticosterone).

cortisone (17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone, Kendall's compound E) (kor´tisōn´),

n a hormone produced by the adrenal cortex; a glucocorticoid, 17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone; useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and some allergic conditions. Has marked antiinflammatory properties. Excess production or administration produces signs of hyperadrenocorticalism (Cushing's syndrome) with hyperlipemia and obesity hyperglycemia and edema.
cortisone acetate,
n brand name: Cortone;
drug class: gluocorticoid, short acting;
action: decreases inflammation by suppression of macrophage and leukocyte migration, reduces capillary permeability;
uses: inflammation, severe allergy, adrenal insufficiency, collagen, and respiratory and dermatologic disorders.

cortisone

a glucocorticoid with significant mineralocorticoid activity, isolated from the adrenal cortex; used as an anti-inflammatory agent and for adrenal replacement therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
For all conditions, you always want to explore what other medications are available that are safer than prednisone or cortisone," advises Dr.
Symptoms were also more likely to come back after a cortisone injection.
In that scenario, contamination with topical hydrocortisone would be suggested by a normal salivary cortisone concentration as measured by LC-MS/MS and a high cortisol-to-cortisone ratio.
The study found that those patients who had received a shot of cortisone were more than sixty percent less likely to develop PTSD.
So if he goes on cortisone, he will need a McDonald's factory built at his place of abode to feed him McNuggets endlessly.
The discomfort is worthwhile if the cortisone is effective at reducing inflammation, but some people do not get much benefit.
In the 50-plus years since they first appeared on the medical market, cortisone (steroid) compounds--the pharmaceutical derivatives of cortisol--have become prominent mainstream medicines because of their anti-inflammatory and immune-suppression applications.
The 37-year-old will have a cortisone injection to relieve the pain in order to compete in the season's second major championship, which starts at Oakmont in Pennsylvania on June 14.
There is a negative correlation between the extent of inactivation of cortisol to cortisone (inhibition of 11[beta]-HSD-2) and elevation of blood pressure.
Mann, currently on holiday in Spain, said yesterday he remained puzzled why the five-year-old's 'A' sample was positive for cortisone because the injection was administered by the stable's vet comfortably with in the recommended period before another race.
I will often suggest a cortisone injection into either the muscle or joint of the shoulder as appropriate to calm down inflammation and promote healing.
More hijinks: Washington GM Jim Bowden found himself in the middle of yet another controversy last week when the Cincinnati Reds discovered reliever Gary Majewski, whom they acquired from the Nationals on July 13, had a cortisone injection in his shoulder shortly before the deal.