corrosive

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corrosive

 [kŏ-ro´siv]
having a caustic and locally destructive effect; an agent having such effects.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cor·ro·sive

(kŏ-rō'siv),
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion, for example, a strong acid or alkali.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cor·ro·sive

(kŏr-ō'siv)
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion (e.g., a strong acid or alkali).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
[20], based on the Hallopeau-Dubin model, proposed an automatic method allowing the control of the corrosiveness of blended waters.
Standard test method for corrosiveness to copper from petroleum products by copper strip test.
The presence of crude oil, including the dilbits we have tested, actually decreases the corrosiveness of the standard brine used in standard testing.
(2) "After twenty years of research, no unleaded formulation has been found that can meet the octane needs of the existing fleet while also maintaining the other necessary safety qualities of an aviation gasoline such as vapor pressure, hot- and cold-starting capabilities, material compatibility, water separation, corrosiveness, storage stability, freeze point, toxicity, and a host of other traits necessary to be a true drop-in," Hackman says.
Corrosiveness, acidity, alkalinity, acute toxicity, and extraction toxicity were used as subfactors for the chemical characteristics.
The cylinders were reinforced to withstand the corrosiveness of the gas.
American Reform Movement leader Rabbi Rick Jacobs lambasted on Tuesday the "the incivility, divisiveness and corrosiveness of America's public discourse that increasingly threatens to tear our own Jewish community apart."
They point out that limitations to the use of raw bio-oils include poor volatility and corrosiveness. These limitations are produced by the bio-oil acidity, relatively high water content, and the oxygenated nature of the bio-oil chemical compounds.
Although it is logical that the age of a building, corrosiveness, and temperature of water may impact the concentration of lead in drinking water, these associations cannot be drawn from the data presented here.