corrosive

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corrosive

 [kŏ-ro´siv]
having a caustic and locally destructive effect; an agent having such effects.

cor·ro·sive

(kŏ-rō'siv),
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion, for example, a strong acid or alkali.

corrosive

/cor·ro·sive/ (kor-o´siv) producing gradual destruction, as of a metal by electrochemical reaction or of the tissues by the action of a strong acid or alkali; an agent that so acts.

corrosive

[kərō′siv]
Etymology: L, corrodere, to gnaw away
1 adj, eating away a substance or tissue, especially by chemical action.
2 n, an agent or substance that eats away a substance or tissue. corrode, v., corrosion, n.

cor·ro·sive

(kŏr-ō'siv)
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion (e.g., a strong acid or alkali).

corrosive

having a caustic and locally destructive effect; an agent having such effects.

corrosive sublimate
mercuric chloride; oldfashioned use as caustic, disinfectant, antiseptic. Called also mercury bichloride.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical properties of the settled water and presence/absence of active bacteria could vary between crude oil sources, but (to my knowledge) there is no literature comparing the corrosiveness of waters from different crude oils.
Reanalysis of the data using the Fisher's exact test, which is an appropriate statistical test when the expected numbers are small but is most commonly applied to 2x2 contingency tables, reveals that lead contamination of drinking water is not significantly related to building age or water corrosiveness but is significantly related to water temperature (p = .
After the organism dies, however, no new shell may be deposited, and the stability of the shell mineral is controlled by the corrosiveness of the surrounding conditions.
The corrosiveness of thinking can make us fearful to entertain unsettling questions about experience.
the only answer is: carefully, so that its memory does not dissolve in the corrosiveness of time.
Thus, at the end of 2008, STNJ presented The Winter's Tale, which is, according to its director Brian Crowe, a "dark fairy-tale [that] dexterously navigates the coldest recesses of the human soul--the corrosiveness of jealousy, the volatility of even the most constant relationships, the cowardice of inaction in the face of tyranny--and yet manages to lead us safely to a final destination rich with hope, forgiveness, and personal rejuvenation.
It has also been reported that changes in temperature can actually increase the corrosiveness of naturally corrosive groundwater [10].
The United States does not accept the legitimacy of continued Israeli settlements," but supplies billions in aid to build them, opposes the legitimate right of Palestinian refugees to return home, backs the corrosiveness of a racist and belligerent Zionism, supports conflicts against an occupied people, and rogue Mahmoud Abbas Fatah elements to divide, conquer, and solidify Israeli hardline rule.
The new solvent systems have several advantages including less toxicity, less corrosiveness, low environmental impact and good health and safety benefits," he said.
The outdoor exposure test (field test) was carried out in the atmospheric corrosion station of CEPEL (Fundao Island, Rio de Janeiro), which has a corrosiveness category equal to C3, according to the standard ISO 9223.
The central focus of these pieces of legislation is the corrosiveness of racial politics, and readers gain insight into the unwillingness of states such as South Carolina to compromise with Virginia over the issue.